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Title: Concealed Threat Detection at Multiple Frames-per-second

Abstract

In this LDRD project, our research purpose is to investigate the science and technology necessary to enable real-time array imaging as a rapid way to detect hidden threats through obscurants such as smoke, fog, walls, doors, and clothing. The goal of this research is to augment the capabilities of protective forces in concealed threat detection. In the current context, threats include people as well as weapons. In most cases, security personnel must make very fast assessments of a threat based upon limited amount of data. Among other attributes, UWB has been shown and quantified to penetrate and propagate through many materials (wood, some concretes, non-metallic building materials, some soils, etc.) while maintaining high range resolution. We have build collaborations with university partners and government agencies. We have considered the impact of psychometrics on target recognition and identification. Specifically we have formulated images in real-time that will engage the user's vision system in a more active way to enhance image interpretation capabilities. In this project, we are researching the use of real time (field programmable gate arrays) integrated with high resolution (cm scale), ultra wide band (UWB) electromagnetic signals for imaging personnel through smoke and walls. We evaluated the ability ofmore » real-time UWB imaging for detecting smaller objects, such as concealed weapons that are carried by the obscured personnel. We also examined the cognitive interpretation process of real time UWB electromagnetic images.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
928155
Report Number(s):
UCRL-TR-218457
TRN: US200815%%507
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; BUILDING MATERIALS; CLOTHING; CONCRETES; DETECTION; DOORS; FOG; PERSONNEL; RESOLUTION; SECURITY PERSONNEL; SOILS; TARGETS; VISION; WEAPONS; WOOD

Citation Formats

Chang, J T. Concealed Threat Detection at Multiple Frames-per-second. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.2172/928155.
Chang, J T. Concealed Threat Detection at Multiple Frames-per-second. United States. doi:10.2172/928155.
Chang, J T. Tue . "Concealed Threat Detection at Multiple Frames-per-second". United States. doi:10.2172/928155. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/928155.
@article{osti_928155,
title = {Concealed Threat Detection at Multiple Frames-per-second},
author = {Chang, J T},
abstractNote = {In this LDRD project, our research purpose is to investigate the science and technology necessary to enable real-time array imaging as a rapid way to detect hidden threats through obscurants such as smoke, fog, walls, doors, and clothing. The goal of this research is to augment the capabilities of protective forces in concealed threat detection. In the current context, threats include people as well as weapons. In most cases, security personnel must make very fast assessments of a threat based upon limited amount of data. Among other attributes, UWB has been shown and quantified to penetrate and propagate through many materials (wood, some concretes, non-metallic building materials, some soils, etc.) while maintaining high range resolution. We have build collaborations with university partners and government agencies. We have considered the impact of psychometrics on target recognition and identification. Specifically we have formulated images in real-time that will engage the user's vision system in a more active way to enhance image interpretation capabilities. In this project, we are researching the use of real time (field programmable gate arrays) integrated with high resolution (cm scale), ultra wide band (UWB) electromagnetic signals for imaging personnel through smoke and walls. We evaluated the ability of real-time UWB imaging for detecting smaller objects, such as concealed weapons that are carried by the obscured personnel. We also examined the cognitive interpretation process of real time UWB electromagnetic images.},
doi = {10.2172/928155},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 08 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 08 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}

Technical Report:

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  • Here they outline considerations that might inform choices for the design of a laser/linac-based light source used to detect {sup 238}U via excitation of the resonance at 680.11 keV in this isotope. They assume that the principal concern is speed of interrogation and not, e.g., how much radiological dose is imparted during a scan. It is found that if the photon detectors used in the system have an energy resolution better than or comparable to that of the interrogation beam, then to a first approximation the light source should be designed to have the highest possible specific fluence (photons permore » unit energy per unit time). there is also a weak dependence of scan time on the number of photons emitted per pulse of the light source. A simple formula describing the tradeoff between specific fluence and number of photons per pulse is presented.« less
  • Active and passive radiometric imaging techniques have been used at 1.4- and 3-mm wavelengths (220 and 100 GHz) to evaluate their potential use in detecting concealed objects. An evaluation of the techniques includes a particular study of their potential in detecting shielded nuclear materials and explosives carried covertly by personnel. We have previously reported images of metal objects and nuclear shielding materials that were detected when concealed under clothing. These images appear with the human body as background. Detection of contraband by radiometric imaging techniques depends upon the differences in emissivity and reflectivity of the contraband relative to human tissue.more » Explosives, unlike metals and metal composites, generally have high emissivities and low reflectivities that closely approximate those of human tissue making explosives difficult to detect. Samples of several common types of explosives (TNT, Detasheet, C4, and several types of water gels) have been examined at the 1.4- and 3-mm wavelengths using active and passive radiometric techniques.« less
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  • Basic technologies have been successfully developed within this project: rapid collection of aerosols and a rapid ultra-sensitive immunoassay technique. Water-soluble, humidity-resistant polyacrylamide nano-filters were shown to (1) capture aerosol particles as small as 20 nm, (2) work in humid air and (3) completely liberate their captured particles in an aqueous solution compatible with the immunoassay technique. The immunoassay technology developed within this project combines electrophoretic capture with magnetic bead detection. It allows detection of as few as 150-600 analyte molecules or viruses in only three minutes, something no other known method can duplicate. The technology can be used in amore » variety of applications where speed of analysis and/or extremely low detection limits are of great importance: in rapid analysis of donor blood for hepatitis, HIV and other blood-borne infections in emergency blood transfusions, in trace analysis of pollutants, or in search of biomarkers in biological fluids. Combined in a single device, the water-soluble filter and ultra-sensitive immunoassay technique may solve the problem of early warning type detection of aerosolized pathogens. These two technologies are protected with five patent applications and are ready for commercialization.« less