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Title: Optical spectroscopy and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy of surface plasmons in core-shell nanoparticles.

Abstract

Silica-silver core-shell nanoparticles were produced using colloidal chemistry methods. Surface plasmon resonances in the silver shells were investigated using optical absorption measurements in ultraviolet-to-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and the effect of shell thickness on the wavelength of the resonance was noted. Further studies of the resonances were performed using electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy-filtered transmission electron microscope (EFTEM) imaging. The plasmon resonance was seen in an EELS spectrum at an energy corresponding to the wavelengths measured in an UV-vis spectrophotometer, and EFTEM images confirmed that the resonance was indeed localized at the surface of the silver shell. Further features were seen in the EELS spectrum and confirmed as bulk-plasmon features of silica and the carbon support film in the TEM specimen.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); FOR
OSTI Identifier:
927991
Report Number(s):
ANL/MSD/JA-56264
Journal ID: ISSN 0021-8979; JAPIAU; TRN: US0804683
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Appl. Phys.; Journal Volume: 101; Journal Issue: 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; ABSORPTION; CARBON; CHEMISTRY; ELECTRON MICROSCOPES; PLASMONS; RESONANCE; SILICA; SILVER; SPECTROSCOPY; THICKNESS; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; WAVELENGTHS

Citation Formats

Eggeman, A. S., Dobson, P. J., Petford-Long, A. K., Materials Science Division, and Oxford Univ. Optical spectroscopy and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy of surface plasmons in core-shell nanoparticles.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2424404.
Eggeman, A. S., Dobson, P. J., Petford-Long, A. K., Materials Science Division, & Oxford Univ. Optical spectroscopy and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy of surface plasmons in core-shell nanoparticles.. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2424404.
Eggeman, A. S., Dobson, P. J., Petford-Long, A. K., Materials Science Division, and Oxford Univ. Mon . "Optical spectroscopy and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy of surface plasmons in core-shell nanoparticles.". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2424404.
@article{osti_927991,
title = {Optical spectroscopy and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy of surface plasmons in core-shell nanoparticles.},
author = {Eggeman, A. S. and Dobson, P. J. and Petford-Long, A. K. and Materials Science Division and Oxford Univ.},
abstractNote = {Silica-silver core-shell nanoparticles were produced using colloidal chemistry methods. Surface plasmon resonances in the silver shells were investigated using optical absorption measurements in ultraviolet-to-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and the effect of shell thickness on the wavelength of the resonance was noted. Further studies of the resonances were performed using electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy-filtered transmission electron microscope (EFTEM) imaging. The plasmon resonance was seen in an EELS spectrum at an energy corresponding to the wavelengths measured in an UV-vis spectrophotometer, and EFTEM images confirmed that the resonance was indeed localized at the surface of the silver shell. Further features were seen in the EELS spectrum and confirmed as bulk-plasmon features of silica and the carbon support film in the TEM specimen.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2424404},
journal = {J. Appl. Phys.},
number = 2007,
volume = 101,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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