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Title: Scalable Visual Reasoning: Supporting Collaboration through Distributed Analysis

Abstract

We present a visualization environment called the Scalable Reasoning System (SRS) that provides a suite of tools for the collection, analysis, and dissemination of reasoning products. This environment is designed to function across multiple platforms, bringing the display of visual information and the capture of reasoning associated with that information to both mobile and desktop clients. The service-oriented architecture of SRS promotes collaboration and interaction between users regardless of their location or platform. Visualization services allow data processing to be centralized and analysis results collected from distributed clients in real time. We use the concept of “reasoning artifacts” to capture the analytic value attached to individual pieces of information and collections thereof, helping to fuse the foraging and sense-making loops in information analysis. Reasoning structures composed of these artifacts can be shared across platforms while maintaining references to the analytic activity (such as interactive visualization) that produced them.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
927982
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-54275
400904120; TRN: US200816%%933
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2007 International Symposium on Collaborative Technologies and Systems, 24-32
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; COMPUTER GRAPHICS; COMPUTER NETWORKS; COOPERATION; DATA ACQUISITION; DATA ANALYSIS; INFORMATION DISSEMINATION; collaborative decision making and support; knowledge management; visualization; mobile collaborative systems

Citation Formats

Pike, William A., May, Richard A., Baddeley, Bob, Riensche, Roderick M., Bruce, Joe, and Younkin, Katarina. Scalable Visual Reasoning: Supporting Collaboration through Distributed Analysis. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Pike, William A., May, Richard A., Baddeley, Bob, Riensche, Roderick M., Bruce, Joe, & Younkin, Katarina. Scalable Visual Reasoning: Supporting Collaboration through Distributed Analysis. United States.
Pike, William A., May, Richard A., Baddeley, Bob, Riensche, Roderick M., Bruce, Joe, and Younkin, Katarina. Mon . "Scalable Visual Reasoning: Supporting Collaboration through Distributed Analysis". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_927982,
title = {Scalable Visual Reasoning: Supporting Collaboration through Distributed Analysis},
author = {Pike, William A. and May, Richard A. and Baddeley, Bob and Riensche, Roderick M. and Bruce, Joe and Younkin, Katarina},
abstractNote = {We present a visualization environment called the Scalable Reasoning System (SRS) that provides a suite of tools for the collection, analysis, and dissemination of reasoning products. This environment is designed to function across multiple platforms, bringing the display of visual information and the capture of reasoning associated with that information to both mobile and desktop clients. The service-oriented architecture of SRS promotes collaboration and interaction between users regardless of their location or platform. Visualization services allow data processing to be centralized and analysis results collected from distributed clients in real time. We use the concept of “reasoning artifacts” to capture the analytic value attached to individual pieces of information and collections thereof, helping to fuse the foraging and sense-making loops in information analysis. Reasoning structures composed of these artifacts can be shared across platforms while maintaining references to the analytic activity (such as interactive visualization) that produced them.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 21 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon May 21 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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