skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Prospects for detecting dark matter with GLAST in light of the WMAP haze.

Abstract

Observations by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) experiment have identified an excess of microwave emission from the center of the Milky Way. It has previously been shown that this 'WMAP haze' could be synchrotron emission from relativistic electrons and positrons produced in the annihilations of dark matter particles. In particular, the intensity, spectrum, and angular distribution of the WMAP haze is consistent with an electroweak scale dark matter particle (such as a supersymmetric neutralino or Kaluza-Klein dark matter in models with universal extra dimensions) annihilating with a cross section on the order of sigma {nu} {approx} 3 x 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3}/s and distributed with a cusped halo profile. No further exotic astrophysical or annihilation boost factors are required. If dark matter annihilations are in fact responsible for the observed haze, then other annihilation products will also be produced, including gamma rays. In this article, we study the prospects for the GLAST satellite to detect gamma rays from dark matter annihilations in the Galactic Center region in this scenario. We find that by studying only the inner 0.1{sup o} around the Galactic Center, GLAST will be able to detect dark matter annihilating to heavy quarks, gauge bosons, or taumore » leptons over astrophysical backgrounds with 5sigma (3sigma) significance if they are lighter than approximately 320-500 GeV (500-750 GeV). If the angular window is broadened to study the dark matter halo profile's angular extension (while simultaneously reducing the astrophysical backgrounds), weakly interacting, massive particles (WIMPs) as heavy as several TeV can be identified by GLAST with high significance. Only if the dark matter particles annihilate mostly to electrons or muons will GLAST be unable to identify the gamma ray spectrum associated with the WMAP haze.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA)
OSTI Identifier:
927766
Report Number(s):
ANL-HEP-PR-08-14
Journal ID: ISSN 1550-7998; TRN: US0804818
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Phys. Rev. D
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 77; Journal Issue: Feb. 2008; Journal ID: ISSN 1550-7998
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ANGULAR DISTRIBUTION; ANISOTROPY; ANNIHILATION; BOSONS; CROSS SECTIONS; DIMENSIONS; ELECTRONS; MILKY WAY; MUONS; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; POSITRONS; PROBES; QUARKS; SATELLITES; SYNCHROTRONS; TAU PARTICLES

Citation Formats

Hooper, D, Zaharijas, G, Finkbeiner, D P, Dobler, G, High Energy Physics, FNAL,, and Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Prospects for detecting dark matter with GLAST in light of the WMAP haze.. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.77.043511.
Hooper, D, Zaharijas, G, Finkbeiner, D P, Dobler, G, High Energy Physics, FNAL,, & Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Prospects for detecting dark matter with GLAST in light of the WMAP haze.. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.77.043511.
Hooper, D, Zaharijas, G, Finkbeiner, D P, Dobler, G, High Energy Physics, FNAL,, and Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Fri . "Prospects for detecting dark matter with GLAST in light of the WMAP haze.". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.77.043511.
@article{osti_927766,
title = {Prospects for detecting dark matter with GLAST in light of the WMAP haze.},
author = {Hooper, D and Zaharijas, G and Finkbeiner, D P and Dobler, G and High Energy Physics and FNAL, and Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics},
abstractNote = {Observations by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) experiment have identified an excess of microwave emission from the center of the Milky Way. It has previously been shown that this 'WMAP haze' could be synchrotron emission from relativistic electrons and positrons produced in the annihilations of dark matter particles. In particular, the intensity, spectrum, and angular distribution of the WMAP haze is consistent with an electroweak scale dark matter particle (such as a supersymmetric neutralino or Kaluza-Klein dark matter in models with universal extra dimensions) annihilating with a cross section on the order of sigma {nu} {approx} 3 x 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3}/s and distributed with a cusped halo profile. No further exotic astrophysical or annihilation boost factors are required. If dark matter annihilations are in fact responsible for the observed haze, then other annihilation products will also be produced, including gamma rays. In this article, we study the prospects for the GLAST satellite to detect gamma rays from dark matter annihilations in the Galactic Center region in this scenario. We find that by studying only the inner 0.1{sup o} around the Galactic Center, GLAST will be able to detect dark matter annihilating to heavy quarks, gauge bosons, or tau leptons over astrophysical backgrounds with 5sigma (3sigma) significance if they are lighter than approximately 320-500 GeV (500-750 GeV). If the angular window is broadened to study the dark matter halo profile's angular extension (while simultaneously reducing the astrophysical backgrounds), weakly interacting, massive particles (WIMPs) as heavy as several TeV can be identified by GLAST with high significance. Only if the dark matter particles annihilate mostly to electrons or muons will GLAST be unable to identify the gamma ray spectrum associated with the WMAP haze.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevD.77.043511},
journal = {Phys. Rev. D},
issn = {1550-7998},
number = Feb. 2008,
volume = 77,
place = {United States},
year = {2008},
month = {2}
}