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Title: Thermo-Oxidation of Tokamak Carbon Dust

Abstract

The oxidation of dust and flakes collected from the DIII-D tokamak, and various commercial dust specimens, has been measured at 350 ºC and 2.0 kPa O2 pressure. Following an initial small mass loss, most of the commercial dust specimens showed very little effect due to O2 exposure. Similarly, dust collected from underneath DIII-D tiles, which is thought to comprise largely Grafoil™ particulates, also showed little susceptibility to oxidation at this temperature. However, oxidation of the dust collected from tile surfaces has led to ~ 18% mass loss after 8 hours; thereafter, little change in mass was observed. This suggests that the surface dust includes some components of different composition and/or structure – possibly fragments of codeposited layers. The oxidation of codeposit flakes scraped form DIII-D upper divertor tiles showed an initial 25% loss in mass due to heating in vacuum, and the gradual loss of 30-38% mass during the subsequent 24 hours exposure to O2. This behavior is significantly different from that observed for the oxidation of thinner DIII-D codeposit specimens which were still adhered to tile surfaces, and this is thought to be related to the low deuterium content (D/C ~ 0.03 – 0.04) of the flakes.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE - SC
OSTI Identifier:
927636
Report Number(s):
INL/CON-08-13664
TRN: US0804806
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC07-99ID-13727
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 13th International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials,Nice, France,12/10/2007,12/14/2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; CARBON; DEUTERIUM; DIVERTORS; DOUBLET-3 DEVICE; DUSTS; HEATING; OXIDATION; PARTICULATES; THERMONUCLEAR REACTOR MATERIALS; fusion materials, tokamak dust, fusion safety

Citation Formats

J.W. Davis, B.W.N. Fitzpatrick, J.P. Sharpe, and A.A. Haasz. Thermo-Oxidation of Tokamak Carbon Dust. United States: N. p., 2008. Web.
J.W. Davis, B.W.N. Fitzpatrick, J.P. Sharpe, & A.A. Haasz. Thermo-Oxidation of Tokamak Carbon Dust. United States.
J.W. Davis, B.W.N. Fitzpatrick, J.P. Sharpe, and A.A. Haasz. Tue . "Thermo-Oxidation of Tokamak Carbon Dust". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/927636.
@article{osti_927636,
title = {Thermo-Oxidation of Tokamak Carbon Dust},
author = {J.W. Davis and B.W.N. Fitzpatrick and J.P. Sharpe and A.A. Haasz},
abstractNote = {The oxidation of dust and flakes collected from the DIII-D tokamak, and various commercial dust specimens, has been measured at 350 ºC and 2.0 kPa O2 pressure. Following an initial small mass loss, most of the commercial dust specimens showed very little effect due to O2 exposure. Similarly, dust collected from underneath DIII-D tiles, which is thought to comprise largely Grafoil™ particulates, also showed little susceptibility to oxidation at this temperature. However, oxidation of the dust collected from tile surfaces has led to ~ 18% mass loss after 8 hours; thereafter, little change in mass was observed. This suggests that the surface dust includes some components of different composition and/or structure – possibly fragments of codeposited layers. The oxidation of codeposit flakes scraped form DIII-D upper divertor tiles showed an initial 25% loss in mass due to heating in vacuum, and the gradual loss of 30-38% mass during the subsequent 24 hours exposure to O2. This behavior is significantly different from that observed for the oxidation of thinner DIII-D codeposit specimens which were still adhered to tile surfaces, and this is thought to be related to the low deuterium content (D/C ~ 0.03 – 0.04) of the flakes.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2008},
month = {4}
}

Conference:
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