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Title: Oak Ridge Integrated Field-Scale Research Challenge:Task D -Multi-Process and Multi-Scale Modeling and Data Analysis

Abstract

The task objectives are: (1) Gain an improved understanding of hydrologic, geochemical and biological processes and their interactions at relevant time and space scales; and (2) Develop practical, site-independent tools for evaluating effects of natural and engineered processes on long-term performance.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
927303
Report Number(s):
CONF/ERSP2007-1029577a
R&D Project: ERSD 1029577a; TRN: US200811%%38
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Annual Environmental Remediation Science Program (ERSP) Principal Investigator Meeting, April 16-19, 2007, Lansdowne, VA
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SITE CHARACTERIZATION; HYDROLOGY; GEOCHEMISTRY; BIOGEOCHEMISTRY; DATA ANALYSIS; BIOREMEDIATION; REMEDIAL ACTION; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION

Citation Formats

Jack Parker. Oak Ridge Integrated Field-Scale Research Challenge:Task D -Multi-Process and Multi-Scale Modeling and Data Analysis. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Jack Parker. Oak Ridge Integrated Field-Scale Research Challenge:Task D -Multi-Process and Multi-Scale Modeling and Data Analysis. United States.
Jack Parker. Thu . "Oak Ridge Integrated Field-Scale Research Challenge:Task D -Multi-Process and Multi-Scale Modeling and Data Analysis". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/927303.
@article{osti_927303,
title = {Oak Ridge Integrated Field-Scale Research Challenge:Task D -Multi-Process and Multi-Scale Modeling and Data Analysis},
author = {Jack Parker},
abstractNote = {The task objectives are: (1) Gain an improved understanding of hydrologic, geochemical and biological processes and their interactions at relevant time and space scales; and (2) Develop practical, site-independent tools for evaluating effects of natural and engineered processes on long-term performance.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Apr 19 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Apr 19 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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