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Title: Extracellular Proteins Limit the Dispersal of BiogenicNanoparticles

Abstract

High spatial-resolution secondaryion microprobespectrometry, synchrotron radiation Fourier-transform infraredspectroscopy and polyacrylamide gel analysis demonstrate the intimateassociation of proteins with spheroidal aggregates of biogenic zincsulfide nanocrystals, an example of extracellular biomineralization.Experiments involving synthetic ZnS nanoparticles and representativeamino acids indicate a driving role for cysteine in rapid nanoparticleaggregation. These findings suggest that microbially-derivedextracellular proteins can limit dispersal of nanoparticulatemetal-bearing phases, such as the mineral products of bioremediation,that may otherwise be transported away from their source by subsurfacefluid flow.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US); Advanced Light Source(ALS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Director, Office of Science; National Aeronautics andSpace Administration
OSTI Identifier:
926601
Report Number(s):
LBNL-62685
R&D Project: 458121; BnR: KC0204016
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231; NASA:NNA04CC02A
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Science; Journal Volume: 316; Journal Issue: 5831; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: June 15,2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54; 63; Proteins aggregates bacteria metal sulfidenanoparticles

Citation Formats

Moreau, John W., Weber, Peter K., Martin, Michael C., Gilbert,Benjamin, Hutcheon, Ian D., and Banfield, Jillian F. Extracellular Proteins Limit the Dispersal of BiogenicNanoparticles. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1126/science.1141064.
Moreau, John W., Weber, Peter K., Martin, Michael C., Gilbert,Benjamin, Hutcheon, Ian D., & Banfield, Jillian F. Extracellular Proteins Limit the Dispersal of BiogenicNanoparticles. United States. doi:10.1126/science.1141064.
Moreau, John W., Weber, Peter K., Martin, Michael C., Gilbert,Benjamin, Hutcheon, Ian D., and Banfield, Jillian F. Fri . "Extracellular Proteins Limit the Dispersal of BiogenicNanoparticles". United States. doi:10.1126/science.1141064. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/926601.
@article{osti_926601,
title = {Extracellular Proteins Limit the Dispersal of BiogenicNanoparticles},
author = {Moreau, John W. and Weber, Peter K. and Martin, Michael C. and Gilbert,Benjamin and Hutcheon, Ian D. and Banfield, Jillian F.},
abstractNote = {High spatial-resolution secondaryion microprobespectrometry, synchrotron radiation Fourier-transform infraredspectroscopy and polyacrylamide gel analysis demonstrate the intimateassociation of proteins with spheroidal aggregates of biogenic zincsulfide nanocrystals, an example of extracellular biomineralization.Experiments involving synthetic ZnS nanoparticles and representativeamino acids indicate a driving role for cysteine in rapid nanoparticleaggregation. These findings suggest that microbially-derivedextracellular proteins can limit dispersal of nanoparticulatemetal-bearing phases, such as the mineral products of bioremediation,that may otherwise be transported away from their source by subsurfacefluid flow.},
doi = {10.1126/science.1141064},
journal = {Science},
number = 5831,
volume = 316,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Apr 27 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri Apr 27 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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