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Title: A Survey of the U.S. ESCO Industry: Market Growth and Developmentfrom 2000 to 2006

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE. Ofc of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability.Office of Electric Transmission and Distribution
OSTI Identifier:
926599
Report Number(s):
LBNL-62679
R&D Project: 673146; BnR: TD5211000
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29

Citation Formats

Hopper, Nicole, Goldman, Charles, Gilligan, Donald, Singer, TerryE., and Birr, Dave. A Survey of the U.S. ESCO Industry: Market Growth and Developmentfrom 2000 to 2006. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/926599.
Hopper, Nicole, Goldman, Charles, Gilligan, Donald, Singer, TerryE., & Birr, Dave. A Survey of the U.S. ESCO Industry: Market Growth and Developmentfrom 2000 to 2006. United States. doi:10.2172/926599.
Hopper, Nicole, Goldman, Charles, Gilligan, Donald, Singer, TerryE., and Birr, Dave. Tue . "A Survey of the U.S. ESCO Industry: Market Growth and Developmentfrom 2000 to 2006". United States. doi:10.2172/926599. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/926599.
@article{osti_926599,
title = {A Survey of the U.S. ESCO Industry: Market Growth and Developmentfrom 2000 to 2006},
author = {Hopper, Nicole and Goldman, Charles and Gilligan, Donald and Singer, TerryE. and Birr, Dave},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.2172/926599},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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