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Title: Design and implementation of an emergency environmental responsesystem to protect migrating salmon in the lower San Joaquin River,California

Abstract

In the past decade tens of millions of dollars have beenspent by water resource agencies in California to restore the nativesalmon fishery in the San Joaquin River and its major tributaries. Anexcavated deep water ship channel (DWSC), through which the river runs onits way to the Bay/Delta and Pacific Ocean, experiences episodes of lowdissolved oxygen which acts as a barrier to anadromous fish migration anda threat to the long-term survival of the salmon run. An emergencyresponse management system is under development to forecast theseepisodes of low dissolved oxygen and to deploy measures that will raisedissolved oxygen concentrations to prevent damage to the fisheryresource. The emergency response management system has been designed tointeract with a real-time water quality monitoring network and is servedby a comprehensive data management and forecasting model toolbox. TheBay/Delta and Tributaries (BDAT) Cooperative Data Management System is adistributed, web accessible database that contains terabytes ofinformation on all aspects of the ecology of the Bay/Delta and upperwatersheds. The complexity of the problem dictates data integration froma variety of monitoring programs. A unique data templating system hasbeen constructed to serve the needs of cooperating scientists who wish toshare their data and to simplify and streamline data uploading into themaster database.more » In this paper we demonstrate the utility of such asystem in providing decision support for management of the San JoaquinRiver fishery. We discuss how the system might be expanded to havefurther utility in coping with other emergencies and threats to watersupply system serving California's costal communities.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
926561
Report Number(s):
LBNL-60622-Rev.
R&D Project: G4W062
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Modelling and Software; Journal Volume: 22; Journal Issue: 4; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54; Dissolved oxygen Decision support Modeling Algae

Citation Formats

Quinn, Nigel W.T., and Jacobs, Karl C.. Design and implementation of an emergency environmental responsesystem to protect migrating salmon in the lower San Joaquin River,California. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Quinn, Nigel W.T., & Jacobs, Karl C.. Design and implementation of an emergency environmental responsesystem to protect migrating salmon in the lower San Joaquin River,California. United States.
Quinn, Nigel W.T., and Jacobs, Karl C.. Mon . "Design and implementation of an emergency environmental responsesystem to protect migrating salmon in the lower San Joaquin River,California". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/926561.
@article{osti_926561,
title = {Design and implementation of an emergency environmental responsesystem to protect migrating salmon in the lower San Joaquin River,California},
author = {Quinn, Nigel W.T. and Jacobs, Karl C.},
abstractNote = {In the past decade tens of millions of dollars have beenspent by water resource agencies in California to restore the nativesalmon fishery in the San Joaquin River and its major tributaries. Anexcavated deep water ship channel (DWSC), through which the river runs onits way to the Bay/Delta and Pacific Ocean, experiences episodes of lowdissolved oxygen which acts as a barrier to anadromous fish migration anda threat to the long-term survival of the salmon run. An emergencyresponse management system is under development to forecast theseepisodes of low dissolved oxygen and to deploy measures that will raisedissolved oxygen concentrations to prevent damage to the fisheryresource. The emergency response management system has been designed tointeract with a real-time water quality monitoring network and is servedby a comprehensive data management and forecasting model toolbox. TheBay/Delta and Tributaries (BDAT) Cooperative Data Management System is adistributed, web accessible database that contains terabytes ofinformation on all aspects of the ecology of the Bay/Delta and upperwatersheds. The complexity of the problem dictates data integration froma variety of monitoring programs. A unique data templating system hasbeen constructed to serve the needs of cooperating scientists who wish toshare their data and to simplify and streamline data uploading into themaster database. In this paper we demonstrate the utility of such asystem in providing decision support for management of the San JoaquinRiver fishery. We discuss how the system might be expanded to havefurther utility in coping with other emergencies and threats to watersupply system serving California's costal communities.},
doi = {},
journal = {Environmental Modelling and Software},
number = 4,
volume = 22,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 30 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Mon Jan 30 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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  • Oxygen and carbon isotopic measurements of fossil bivalves (Macoma nasuta) contained in estuarine sediment are used to reconstruct a late Holocene record of salinity and stream flow in San Francisco Bay. Discharge into the bay is a particularly good indicator of paleoclimate in California because the bay's influent streams drain 40 percent of the state, The isotopic record suggests that between about 1670 and 1900 calendar years (yr cal) B.P. inflow to the bay was substantially greater than the estimated prediversion inflow of 1100 m(3)/s, An unconformity representing a 900 yr hiatus is present in the core between 1670 andmore » 750 yr cal B.P., possibly caused by a major hydrological event. Over the past 750 yr, stream flow to San Francisco Bay has varied with a period of 200 yr; alternate wet and dry (drought) intervals typically have lasted 40 to 160 yr.« less
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