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Title: Cooperative Research and Development of Primary Surface Recuperator for Advanced Microturbine Systems

Abstract

Recuperators have been identified as key components of advanced gas turbines systems that achieve a measure of improvement in operating efficiency and lead the field in achieving very low emissions. Every gas turbine manufacturer that is studying, developing, or commercializing advanced recuperated gas turbine cycles requests that recuperators operate at higher temperature without a reduction in design life and must cost less. The Solar Cooperative Research and Development of Primary Surface Recuperator for Advanced Microturbine Systems Program is directed towards meeting the future requirements of advanced gas turbine systems by the following: (1) The development of advanced alloys that will allow recuperator inlet exhaust gas temperatures to increase without significant cost increase. (2) Further characterization of the creep and oxidation (dry and humid air) properties of nickel alloy foils (less than 0.13 mm thick) to allow the economical use of these materials. (3) Increasing the use of advanced robotic systems and advanced in-process statistical measurement systems.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Solar Turbines Incorporated
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
926171
DOE Contract Number:
FC26-00CH11062
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; AIR; ALLOYS; CREEP; DESIGN; EFFICIENCY; GAS TURBINES; MANUFACTURERS; NICKEL ALLOYS; OXIDATION; PROGRESS REPORT

Citation Formats

Escola, George. Cooperative Research and Development of Primary Surface Recuperator for Advanced Microturbine Systems. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/926171.
Escola, George. Cooperative Research and Development of Primary Surface Recuperator for Advanced Microturbine Systems. United States. doi:10.2172/926171.
Escola, George. Wed . "Cooperative Research and Development of Primary Surface Recuperator for Advanced Microturbine Systems". United States. doi:10.2172/926171. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/926171.
@article{osti_926171,
title = {Cooperative Research and Development of Primary Surface Recuperator for Advanced Microturbine Systems},
author = {Escola, George},
abstractNote = {Recuperators have been identified as key components of advanced gas turbines systems that achieve a measure of improvement in operating efficiency and lead the field in achieving very low emissions. Every gas turbine manufacturer that is studying, developing, or commercializing advanced recuperated gas turbine cycles requests that recuperators operate at higher temperature without a reduction in design life and must cost less. The Solar Cooperative Research and Development of Primary Surface Recuperator for Advanced Microturbine Systems Program is directed towards meeting the future requirements of advanced gas turbine systems by the following: (1) The development of advanced alloys that will allow recuperator inlet exhaust gas temperatures to increase without significant cost increase. (2) Further characterization of the creep and oxidation (dry and humid air) properties of nickel alloy foils (less than 0.13 mm thick) to allow the economical use of these materials. (3) Increasing the use of advanced robotic systems and advanced in-process statistical measurement systems.},
doi = {10.2172/926171},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 17 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Wed Jan 17 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The Advanced Integrated Microturbine Systems (AIMS) project was kicked off in October of 2000 to develop the next generation microturbine system. The overall objective of the project was to develop a design for a 40% electrical efficiency microturbine system and demonstrate many of the enabling technologies. The project was initiated as a collaborative effort between several units of GE, Elliott Energy Systems, Turbo Genset, Oak Ridge National Lab and Kyocera. Since the inception of the project the partners have changed but the overall direction of the project has stayed consistent. The project began as a systems study to identify designmore » options to achieve the ultimate goal of 40% electrical efficiency. Once the optimized analytical design was identified for the 40% system, it was determined that a 35% efficient machine would be capable of demonstrating many of the advanced technologies within the given budget and timeframe. The items that would not be experimentally demonstrated were fully produced ceramic parts. However, to understand the requirements of these ceramics, an effort was included in the project to experimentally evaluate candidate materials in representative conditions. The results from this effort would clearly identify the challenges and improvement required of these materials for the full design. Following the analytical effort, the project was dedicated to component development and testing. Each component and subsystem was designed with the overall system requirements in mind and each tested to the fullest extent possible prior to being integrated together. This method of component development and evaluation helps to minimize the technical risk of the project. Once all of the components were completed, they were assembled into the full system and experimentally evaluated.« less
  • Midwest Research Institute (MRI) and AVL Powertrain Engineering, Inc. (AVL) have executed a Software and Trademark License Agreement (Software License) by which AVL is granted the exclusive right to use, modify and improve and to commercialize by reproducing, distributing and granting sublicenses in, certain computer software known as ADVISOR 2003.
  • Purpose of the ATS program is to develop a new baseline for industrial gas turbine systems for the 21st century. A recuperated gas turbine cycle was selected; the eventual engine that result will utilize Solar`s Primary Surface Recuperator (PSR) technology. Besides higher thermal efficiency, other goals included lower emission, cost of power, and improved RAMD (reliability, availability, maintainability). Performance data have been obtained for the candidate heat transfer surface, and on a scaled rig. Pretest predictions of air-side and gas-side pressure drop were in very good agreement with tests results; predicted effectiveness also agreed well with experiment. A flattened tubemore » test to determine changes of the PSR heat transfer surface profile after exposure is underway.« less
  • Solar`s Primary Surface Recuperator (PSR) is a compact, high thermal effectiveness heat exchanger for reducing fuel consumption and increasing the thermal efficiency of gas turbine engines. (Recuperation extracts waste heat from the turbine exhaust stream to heat the compressor discharge air before entry into the combustion system.) Solar`s PSR is comprised of thin, folded, corrugated sheets of a stainless steel (eg type 347) in modular units (air cells). Since sheet data are not applicable to thin foils, effort was focused on acquiring creep, tensile, and oxidation data for a variety of stainless and alloy materials. A new thin foil materialmore » was created from two separate materials welded together at gage; the advanced alloy would be used only in the hottest sections of the recuperator and the stainless would be used elsewhere to keep the cost down.« less
  • Evaluation of the performance of innovative thermal barrier coating systems for applications at high temperatures in advanced industrical gas turbines.