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Title: Pulsed Power for Solid-State Lasers

Abstract

Beginning in the early 1970s, a number of research and development efforts were undertaken at U.S. National Laboratories with a goal of developing high power lasers whose characteristics were suitable for investigating the feasibility of laser-driven fusion. A number of different laser systems were developed and tested at ever larger scale in pursuit of the optimum driver for laser fusion experiments. Each of these systems had associated with it a unique pulsed power option. A considerable amount of original and innovative engineering was carried out in support of these options. Ultimately, the Solid-state Laser approach was selected as the optimum driver for the application. Following this, the Laser Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the University of Rochester undertook aggressive efforts directed at developing the technology. In particular, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a series of laser systems beginning with the Cyclops laser and culminating in the present with the National Ignition Facility were developed and tested. As a result, a large amount of design information for solid-state laser pulsed power systems has been documented. Some of it is in the form of published papers, but most of it is buried in internal memoranda, engineering reports and LLNLmore » annual reports. One of the goals of this book is to gather this information into a single useable format, such that it is easily accessed and understood by other engineers and physicists for use with future designs. It can also serve as a primer, which when seriously studied, makes the subsequent reading of original work and follow-up references considerably easier. While this book deals only with the solid-state laser pulsed power systems, in the bibliography we have included a representative cross section of papers and references from much of the very fine work carried out at other institutions in support of different laser approaches. Finally, in recent years, there has been a renewed interest in high-average-power solid-state glass lasers. Much of the prime power technology developed in support of this has definite applications in the long term for fusion power plant scenarios.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
925998
Report Number(s):
LLNL-BOOK-400175
TRN: US200807%%462
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; CROSS SECTIONS; DESIGN; ENGINEERS; GLASS; LASERS; LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY; POWER PLANTS; POWER SYSTEMS; SOLID STATE LASERS; US NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY

Citation Formats

Gagnon, W, Albrecht, G, Trenholme, J, and Newton, M. Pulsed Power for Solid-State Lasers. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Gagnon, W, Albrecht, G, Trenholme, J, & Newton, M. Pulsed Power for Solid-State Lasers. United States.
Gagnon, W, Albrecht, G, Trenholme, J, and Newton, M. Thu . "Pulsed Power for Solid-State Lasers". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/925998.
@article{osti_925998,
title = {Pulsed Power for Solid-State Lasers},
author = {Gagnon, W and Albrecht, G and Trenholme, J and Newton, M},
abstractNote = {Beginning in the early 1970s, a number of research and development efforts were undertaken at U.S. National Laboratories with a goal of developing high power lasers whose characteristics were suitable for investigating the feasibility of laser-driven fusion. A number of different laser systems were developed and tested at ever larger scale in pursuit of the optimum driver for laser fusion experiments. Each of these systems had associated with it a unique pulsed power option. A considerable amount of original and innovative engineering was carried out in support of these options. Ultimately, the Solid-state Laser approach was selected as the optimum driver for the application. Following this, the Laser Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the University of Rochester undertook aggressive efforts directed at developing the technology. In particular, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a series of laser systems beginning with the Cyclops laser and culminating in the present with the National Ignition Facility were developed and tested. As a result, a large amount of design information for solid-state laser pulsed power systems has been documented. Some of it is in the form of published papers, but most of it is buried in internal memoranda, engineering reports and LLNL annual reports. One of the goals of this book is to gather this information into a single useable format, such that it is easily accessed and understood by other engineers and physicists for use with future designs. It can also serve as a primer, which when seriously studied, makes the subsequent reading of original work and follow-up references considerably easier. While this book deals only with the solid-state laser pulsed power systems, in the bibliography we have included a representative cross section of papers and references from much of the very fine work carried out at other institutions in support of different laser approaches. Finally, in recent years, there has been a renewed interest in high-average-power solid-state glass lasers. Much of the prime power technology developed in support of this has definite applications in the long term for fusion power plant scenarios.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Apr 19 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Apr 19 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

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