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Title: Development and analysis of a compact low-conversion ratio fast burner reactor.

Abstract

This report explores design options for compact fast burner reactors that can achieve low conversion ratios. Operational characteristics and whole-core reactivity coefficients are generated and contrasted with low conversion ratio designs of previous studies. A compact core point design is then selected and detailed reactivity coefficients are displayed and discussed. The effectiveness of fast spectrum systems for actinide transmutation has been well documented. The key advantage of the fast spectrum resides in the severely reduced capture/fission ratios. this inhibits the production of the higher actinides that dominate the long-term radiotoxicity of nuclear waste. In conventional fast burner studies, the transmutation rate was limited by constraints placed on the fuel composition. In an earlier phase of this study the entire range of fuel compositions (including non-uranium fuel) was explored to assess the performance and safety limits of fast burner reactor systems. In this report, similar fuel compositions are utilized for application in compact configurations to achieve conversion ratios below 0.5.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
925322
Report Number(s):
ANL-AFCI-084
TRN: US0803037
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; ACTINIDES; BURNERS; CONVERSION RATIO; DESIGN; PERFORMANCE; PRODUCTION; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; REACTIVITY COEFFICIENTS; SAFETY; TRANSMUTATION

Citation Formats

Smith, M. A., Hill, R. N., and Nuclear Engineering Division. Development and analysis of a compact low-conversion ratio fast burner reactor.. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/925322.
Smith, M. A., Hill, R. N., & Nuclear Engineering Division. Development and analysis of a compact low-conversion ratio fast burner reactor.. United States. doi:10.2172/925322.
Smith, M. A., Hill, R. N., and Nuclear Engineering Division. Fri . "Development and analysis of a compact low-conversion ratio fast burner reactor.". United States. doi:10.2172/925322. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/925322.
@article{osti_925322,
title = {Development and analysis of a compact low-conversion ratio fast burner reactor.},
author = {Smith, M. A. and Hill, R. N. and Nuclear Engineering Division},
abstractNote = {This report explores design options for compact fast burner reactors that can achieve low conversion ratios. Operational characteristics and whole-core reactivity coefficients are generated and contrasted with low conversion ratio designs of previous studies. A compact core point design is then selected and detailed reactivity coefficients are displayed and discussed. The effectiveness of fast spectrum systems for actinide transmutation has been well documented. The key advantage of the fast spectrum resides in the severely reduced capture/fission ratios. this inhibits the production of the higher actinides that dominate the long-term radiotoxicity of nuclear waste. In conventional fast burner studies, the transmutation rate was limited by constraints placed on the fuel composition. In an earlier phase of this study the entire range of fuel compositions (including non-uranium fuel) was explored to assess the performance and safety limits of fast burner reactor systems. In this report, similar fuel compositions are utilized for application in compact configurations to achieve conversion ratios below 0.5.},
doi = {10.2172/925322},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri May 12 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Fri May 12 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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