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Title: Phosphor-Free Solid State Light Sources

Abstract

The objective of this work was to demonstrate a light emitting diode that emitted white light without the aid of a phosphor. The device was based on the combination of a nitride LED and a fluorescing ZnO substrate. The early portion of the work focused on the growth of ZnO in undoped and doped form. The doped ZnO was successfully engineered to emit light at specific wavelengths by incorporating various dopants into the crystalline lattice. Thereafter, the focus of the work shifted to the epitaxial growth of nitride structures on ZnO. Initially, the epitaxy was accomplished with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Later in the program, metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) was successfully used to grow nitrides on ZnO. By combining the characteristics of the doped ZnO substrate with epitaxially grown nitride LED structures, a phosphor-free white light emitting diode was successfully demonstrated and characterized.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Cermet Inc
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
923031
DOE Contract Number:
FC26-03NT41942
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION; EPITAXY; LIGHT EMITTING DIODES; LIGHT SOURCES; MOLECULAR BEAM EPITAXY; NITRIDES; SUBSTRATES; WAVELENGTHS

Citation Formats

Nause, Jeff E, Ferguson, Ian, and Doolittle, Alan. Phosphor-Free Solid State Light Sources. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/923031.
Nause, Jeff E, Ferguson, Ian, & Doolittle, Alan. Phosphor-Free Solid State Light Sources. United States. doi:10.2172/923031.
Nause, Jeff E, Ferguson, Ian, and Doolittle, Alan. Wed . "Phosphor-Free Solid State Light Sources". United States. doi:10.2172/923031. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/923031.
@article{osti_923031,
title = {Phosphor-Free Solid State Light Sources},
author = {Nause, Jeff E and Ferguson, Ian and Doolittle, Alan},
abstractNote = {The objective of this work was to demonstrate a light emitting diode that emitted white light without the aid of a phosphor. The device was based on the combination of a nitride LED and a fluorescing ZnO substrate. The early portion of the work focused on the growth of ZnO in undoped and doped form. The doped ZnO was successfully engineered to emit light at specific wavelengths by incorporating various dopants into the crystalline lattice. Thereafter, the focus of the work shifted to the epitaxial growth of nitride structures on ZnO. Initially, the epitaxy was accomplished with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Later in the program, metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) was successfully used to grow nitrides on ZnO. By combining the characteristics of the doped ZnO substrate with epitaxially grown nitride LED structures, a phosphor-free white light emitting diode was successfully demonstrated and characterized.},
doi = {10.2172/923031},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 28 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Wed Feb 28 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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