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Title: Right-Sizing Laboratory Equipment Loads

Abstract

Laboratory equipment such as autoclaves, glass washers, refrigerators, and computers account for a significant portion of the energy use in laboratories. However, because of the general lack of measured equipment load data for laboratories, designers often use estimates based on 'nameplate' rated data, or design assumptions from prior projects. Consequently, peak equipment loads are frequently overestimated. This results in oversized HVAC systems, increased initial construction costs, and increased energy use due to inefficiencies at low part-load operation. This best-practice guide first presents the problem of over-sizing in typical practice, and then describes how best-practice strategies obtain better estimates of equipment loads and right-size HVAC systems, saving initial construction costs as well as life-cycle energy costs. This guide is one in a series created by the Laboratories for the 21st Century ('Labs21') program, a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Energy. Geared towards architects, engineers, and facilities managers, these guides provide information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Director, Office of Science; Environmental ProtectionAgency
OSTI Identifier:
922847
Report Number(s):
LBNL-60604
R&D Project: E49202; TRN: US200806%%326
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231; EPA:E49201
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32; ARCHITECTS; AUTOCLAVES; COMPUTERS; CONSTRUCTION; DESIGN; ENERGY ACCOUNTING; ENGINEERS; GLASS; HVAC SYSTEMS; LABORATORY EQUIPMENT; LIFE CYCLE; REFRIGERATORS; US EPA

Citation Formats

Frenze, David, Greenberg, Steve, Mathew, Paul, Sartor, Dale, and Starr, William. Right-Sizing Laboratory Equipment Loads. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.2172/922847.
Frenze, David, Greenberg, Steve, Mathew, Paul, Sartor, Dale, & Starr, William. Right-Sizing Laboratory Equipment Loads. United States. doi:10.2172/922847.
Frenze, David, Greenberg, Steve, Mathew, Paul, Sartor, Dale, and Starr, William. Tue . "Right-Sizing Laboratory Equipment Loads". United States. doi:10.2172/922847. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/922847.
@article{osti_922847,
title = {Right-Sizing Laboratory Equipment Loads},
author = {Frenze, David and Greenberg, Steve and Mathew, Paul and Sartor, Dale and Starr, William},
abstractNote = {Laboratory equipment such as autoclaves, glass washers, refrigerators, and computers account for a significant portion of the energy use in laboratories. However, because of the general lack of measured equipment load data for laboratories, designers often use estimates based on 'nameplate' rated data, or design assumptions from prior projects. Consequently, peak equipment loads are frequently overestimated. This results in oversized HVAC systems, increased initial construction costs, and increased energy use due to inefficiencies at low part-load operation. This best-practice guide first presents the problem of over-sizing in typical practice, and then describes how best-practice strategies obtain better estimates of equipment loads and right-size HVAC systems, saving initial construction costs as well as life-cycle energy costs. This guide is one in a series created by the Laboratories for the 21st Century ('Labs21') program, a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Energy. Geared towards architects, engineers, and facilities managers, these guides provide information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories.},
doi = {10.2172/922847},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 29 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 29 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}

Technical Report:

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