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Title: Human-Centered Fusion Framework

Abstract

In recent years the benefits of fusing signatures extracted from large amounts of distributed and/or heterogeneous data sources have been largely documented in various problems ranging from biological protein function prediction to cyberspace monitoring. In spite of significant progress in information fusion research, there is still no formal theoretical framework for defining various types of information fusion systems, defining and analyzing relations among such types, and designing information fusion systems using a formal method approach. Consequently, fusion systems are often poorly understood, are less than optimal, and/or do not suit user needs. To start addressing these issues, we outline a formal humancentered fusion framework for reasoning about fusion strategies. Our approach relies on a new taxonomy for fusion strategies, an alternative definition of information fusion in terms of parameterized paths in signature related spaces, an algorithmic formalization of fusion strategies and a library of numeric and dynamic visual tools measuring the impact as well as the impact behavior of fusion strategies. Using a real case of intelligence analysis we demonstrate that the proposed framework enables end users to rapidly 1) develop and implement alternative fusion strategies, 2) understand the impact of each strategy, 3) compare the various strategies, and 4)more » perform the above steps without having to know the mathematical foundations of the framework. We also demonstrate that the human impact on a fusion system is critical in the sense that small changes in strategies do not necessarily correspond to small changes in results.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
922572
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-57857
TRN: US200803%%502
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2007 IEEE Conference on Technologies for Homeland Security: Enhancing Critical Infrastructure Dependability, May 16-17, 2007, Woburn, MA, 111-116
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; FORECASTING; MONITORING; PROTEINS; SECURITY; TAXONOMY

Citation Formats

Posse, Christian, White, Amanda M., and Beagley, Nathaniel. Human-Centered Fusion Framework. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1109/THS.2007.370030.
Posse, Christian, White, Amanda M., & Beagley, Nathaniel. Human-Centered Fusion Framework. United States. doi:10.1109/THS.2007.370030.
Posse, Christian, White, Amanda M., and Beagley, Nathaniel. Wed . "Human-Centered Fusion Framework". United States. doi:10.1109/THS.2007.370030.
@article{osti_922572,
title = {Human-Centered Fusion Framework},
author = {Posse, Christian and White, Amanda M. and Beagley, Nathaniel},
abstractNote = {In recent years the benefits of fusing signatures extracted from large amounts of distributed and/or heterogeneous data sources have been largely documented in various problems ranging from biological protein function prediction to cyberspace monitoring. In spite of significant progress in information fusion research, there is still no formal theoretical framework for defining various types of information fusion systems, defining and analyzing relations among such types, and designing information fusion systems using a formal method approach. Consequently, fusion systems are often poorly understood, are less than optimal, and/or do not suit user needs. To start addressing these issues, we outline a formal humancentered fusion framework for reasoning about fusion strategies. Our approach relies on a new taxonomy for fusion strategies, an alternative definition of information fusion in terms of parameterized paths in signature related spaces, an algorithmic formalization of fusion strategies and a library of numeric and dynamic visual tools measuring the impact as well as the impact behavior of fusion strategies. Using a real case of intelligence analysis we demonstrate that the proposed framework enables end users to rapidly 1) develop and implement alternative fusion strategies, 2) understand the impact of each strategy, 3) compare the various strategies, and 4) perform the above steps without having to know the mathematical foundations of the framework. We also demonstrate that the human impact on a fusion system is critical in the sense that small changes in strategies do not necessarily correspond to small changes in results.},
doi = {10.1109/THS.2007.370030},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed May 16 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Wed May 16 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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