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Title: Synthesis of nanostructured hybrid sorbent materials using organosilane self-assembly on mesoporous ceramic oxides

Abstract

The single most important factor in determining quality of life in human society is the availability of pure, clean drinking water. Wars have been fought, and will continue to be fought, over access and control of clean water. Drinking water has two major classes of contamination, biological contamination and chemical contamination. Bacterial contamination can be dealt with by a number of well-established technologies (e.g. chlorination, ozone, UV, etc.), but chemical contamination is a somewhat more challenging target. Common organic contaminants, such as pesticides, agricultural chemicals, industrial solvents, and fuels can be removed by treatment with UV/ozone, activated carbon or plasma technologies. Toxic heavy metals like mercury, lead and cadmium can be partially addressed by using traditional sorbent materials like alumina, but these materials bind metal ions non-specifically and can easily be saturated with harmless, ubiquitous species like calcium, magnesium and zinc (which are actually nutrients, and don’t need to be removed). Another weakness of these traditional sorbent materials is that metal ion sorption to a ceramic oxide surface is a reversible process, meaning they can easily desorb back into the drinking water supply.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
922567
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-49235
KP1301020; TRN: US200803%%435
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Environmental Applications of Nanomaterials: Synthesis, Sorbents and Sensors, 159-178
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; SYNTHESIS; NANOSTRUCTURES; ADSORBENTS; SILANES; DRINKING WATER; WATER TREATMENT; DEMETALLIZATION; HEAVY METALS

Citation Formats

Fryxell, Glen E. Synthesis of nanostructured hybrid sorbent materials using organosilane self-assembly on mesoporous ceramic oxides. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Fryxell, Glen E. Synthesis of nanostructured hybrid sorbent materials using organosilane self-assembly on mesoporous ceramic oxides. United States.
Fryxell, Glen E. Tue . "Synthesis of nanostructured hybrid sorbent materials using organosilane self-assembly on mesoporous ceramic oxides". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_922567,
title = {Synthesis of nanostructured hybrid sorbent materials using organosilane self-assembly on mesoporous ceramic oxides},
author = {Fryxell, Glen E.},
abstractNote = {The single most important factor in determining quality of life in human society is the availability of pure, clean drinking water. Wars have been fought, and will continue to be fought, over access and control of clean water. Drinking water has two major classes of contamination, biological contamination and chemical contamination. Bacterial contamination can be dealt with by a number of well-established technologies (e.g. chlorination, ozone, UV, etc.), but chemical contamination is a somewhat more challenging target. Common organic contaminants, such as pesticides, agricultural chemicals, industrial solvents, and fuels can be removed by treatment with UV/ozone, activated carbon or plasma technologies. Toxic heavy metals like mercury, lead and cadmium can be partially addressed by using traditional sorbent materials like alumina, but these materials bind metal ions non-specifically and can easily be saturated with harmless, ubiquitous species like calcium, magnesium and zinc (which are actually nutrients, and don’t need to be removed). Another weakness of these traditional sorbent materials is that metal ion sorption to a ceramic oxide surface is a reversible process, meaning they can easily desorb back into the drinking water supply.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 30 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Tue Jan 30 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Book:
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  • Self-assembled functional molecules in mesoporous materials are synthesized directly either by co-assembly of dye-bound surfactant of ferrocenyl TMA with silicate or Pc (phthalocyanine) molecules doped in the C{sub 16}TMA micelles with oxides framework such as V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, MoO{sub 3}, WO{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2}. The process provides well-organized molecular doped mesoporous structure by direct and simple procedure.
  • Demanding design requirements frequently call for the use and joining of combinations of oxide and nonoxide ceramics, intermetallics, and metals in virtually every imaginable combination in both monolithic and reinforced forms, resulting in hybrid structures. Such new, nontraditional materials and structures can be expected to require new, nontraditional joining processes. One attractive, but embryonic option, is pressurized combustion synthesis, a form of exothermic welding or brazing. Pressurized combustion synthesis or self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) joining is being systematically studied to understand the mechanism(s) of joint formation, understand the role of processing parameters, evaluate and optimize joint properties, and develop amore » process model for use in joint design, parameter selection, property prediction, and intelligent process control. This paper presents the results of a study on a model system of 3Ni + Al > Ni{sub 3}Al filler or intermediate between nickel-base superalloy end elements. A Gleeble thermal-mechanical simulator was used to investigate the effects of reaction temperature, hold time, applied pressure, reactant composition, and heating rate, and good insight has been gained to enable more intensive studies of process fundamentals and of techniques for producing more complex, functional gradient material (FGM) joints between dissimilar combinations of ceramics, intermetallics and metals.« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • There exists a significant need today for high capacity, high efficiency sorbent materials to selectively sequester toxic metal species from groundwater or wastestreams. We have an on-going effort at PNNL to design, synthesize, characterize and evaluate functionalized nanoporous materials for environmental remediation, sensing/detection and device applications.
  • Self-Assembly Synthesis and Functionalization of Mesoporous Carbon Materials for Energy-Related Applications Sheng Dai Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831-6201 Porous carbon materials are ubiquitous in separation, catalysis, and energy storage/conversion. Well-defined mesoporous carbon materials are essential for a number of the aforementioned applications. Ordered porous carbon materials have previously been synthesized using colloidal crystals and presynthesized mesoporous silicas as hard templates. The mesostructures of these carbon materials are connected via ultrathin carbon filaments and can readily collapse under high-temperature conditions. Furthermore, these hard-template methodologies are extremely difficult to adapt to the fabrication of large-scale orderedmore » nanoporous films or monoliths with controlled pore orientations. More recently, my research group at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and several others around the world have developed alternative methods for synthesis of highly ordered mesoporous carbons via self-assembly. Unlike the mesoporous carbons synthesized via hard-template methods, these mesoporous carbons are highly stable and can be graphitized at high temperature (>2800ᵒC) without significant loss of mesopores. The surface properties of these materials can be further tailored via surface functionalization. This seminar will provide an overview and perspective of the mesoporous carbon materials derived from soft-template synthesis and surface functionalization and their fascinating applications in catalysis, separation, and energy storage devices. Dr. Sheng Dai got his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Zhejiang University in 1984 and 1986, respectively. He subsequently obtained a PhD degree from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville in 1990. He is currently a Senior Staff Scientist and Group Leader of Nanomaterials Group and Center for Nanophase Materials Science of Oak Ridge National Laboratory and is also affiliated with the University of Tennessee as an adjunct professor. He is a co-author of more than 200 publications. His research interests include porous materials and their functionalization, new ionic liquids for chemical separation and materials synthesis, sol-gel synthesis and molecular imprinting of inorganic materials, and catalysis by nanomaterials especially gold nanocatalysts.« less