skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Don’t Let the HumBUG Get Achoo - Tips for a healthy winter at work and home

Abstract

Safety-related article for recurrinig column in the Tri-City Area Journal of Business. Focuses on seasonal wellness tips for employers and employees - namely, cold and flu prevention through personal hygiene.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
922187
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-52858
TRN: US200803%%216
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Tri-Cities Area Journal of Business, 5(12):21; Journal Volume: 5; Journal Issue: 12
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; SAFETY; SEASONAL VARIATIONS; RECOMMENDATIONS; DISEASES; MITIGATION; safety; wellness

Citation Formats

Schlender, Michael H. Don’t Let the HumBUG Get Achoo - Tips for a healthy winter at work and home. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Schlender, Michael H. Don’t Let the HumBUG Get Achoo - Tips for a healthy winter at work and home. United States.
Schlender, Michael H. Fri . "Don’t Let the HumBUG Get Achoo - Tips for a healthy winter at work and home". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_922187,
title = {Don’t Let the HumBUG Get Achoo - Tips for a healthy winter at work and home},
author = {Schlender, Michael H.},
abstractNote = {Safety-related article for recurrinig column in the Tri-City Area Journal of Business. Focuses on seasonal wellness tips for employers and employees - namely, cold and flu prevention through personal hygiene.},
doi = {},
journal = {Tri-Cities Area Journal of Business, 5(12):21},
number = 12,
volume = 5,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • The consequences of leaking or corroded underground storage tanks can be disastrous. Highly effective methods for protecting tanks from the environment exist.
  • No abstract prepared.
  • During the 1970s the building industry witnessed a focus on energy-conserving building materials sparked by oil-price increases; during the 1980s attention to building materials that reduced or omitted pollutants became important as a result of the {open_quotes}Sick Building Syndrome{close_quotes} or indoor air pollution. Now, in the 1990s, we are engaged with a more comprehensive definition of environmental materials and technologies. This definition encompasses both energy-conserving products and so-called nontoxic or healthy products. But more importantly, it defines a new component, resource management. As the world enters the 21st century, we are more aware that the world`s resources are dwindling atmore » rapid speed, and the need to conserve, to recycle, and to sustainably manage these resources is vital. The building industry has a primary role to play in the management. This role begins in the selection of materials and technologies used in building itself. This article describes 4 different categories of environmental materials (energy conservation; health, resource management, and waste management) and describes what they replace, why they replace current materials, where they can be found, and what is lies in the future. 1 ref.« less
  • Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the correlation between ERMI values in the HUD American Healthy Home Survey (AHHS) homes and either inspector reports or occupant assessments of mold and moisture. Methods: In the AHHS, moisture and mold were assessed by a pair of inspectors and with an occupant questionnaire. These results were compared to the results of the Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) values for each home. Results: Homes in the highest ERMI quartile were most often in agreement with visual inspection and/or occupant assessment. However, in 52% of the fourth quartile ERMI homes, the inspectormore » and occupant assessment did not indicate water or mold problems. Yet the concentrations of each ERMI panel mold species detected in all fourth quartile homes were statistically indistinguishable. Conclusions: About 50% of water-damaged, moldy homes were not detected by inspection or questioning of the occupant about water and mold.« less