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Title: Monitoring subsurface contamination using tree branches.

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
921878
Report Number(s):
ANL/ES/JA-54744
Journal ID: ISSN 1069-3629; GWMREV; TRN: US200802%%951
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Ground Water Monit. Remediat.; Journal Volume: 27; Journal Issue: 1 ; 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SOILS; CONTAMINATION; MONITORING; TREES; BIOLOGICAL INDICATORS

Citation Formats

Gopalakrishnan, G., Negri, C. M., Minsker, B. S., Werth, C. J., Energy Systems, and Univ. of Illinois. Monitoring subsurface contamination using tree branches.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1111/j.1745-6592.2006.00124.x.
Gopalakrishnan, G., Negri, C. M., Minsker, B. S., Werth, C. J., Energy Systems, & Univ. of Illinois. Monitoring subsurface contamination using tree branches.. United States. doi:10.1111/j.1745-6592.2006.00124.x.
Gopalakrishnan, G., Negri, C. M., Minsker, B. S., Werth, C. J., Energy Systems, and Univ. of Illinois. Mon . "Monitoring subsurface contamination using tree branches.". United States. doi:10.1111/j.1745-6592.2006.00124.x.
@article{osti_921878,
title = {Monitoring subsurface contamination using tree branches.},
author = {Gopalakrishnan, G. and Negri, C. M. and Minsker, B. S. and Werth, C. J. and Energy Systems and Univ. of Illinois},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {10.1111/j.1745-6592.2006.00124.x},
journal = {Ground Water Monit. Remediat.},
number = 1 ; 2007,
volume = 27,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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