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Title: Probing the Unique Size-Dependent Properties of Small Au Clusters, Au Alloy Clusters, and CO Chemisorbed Au Clusters in the Gas Phase

Abstract

When materials are reduced in size to the nanometer scale, their physical and chemical properties undergo major changes and become size-dependent, forming the foundation for nanoscience and nanotechnology. Gold nanoparticles and small gold clusters have been the focus of intensive research activities lately. The modern “goldrush” is largely motivated by the recent discoveries that (i) nanogold shows unexpected catalytic properties for a wide spectrum of chemical reactions [1], (ii) nanogold enables selective binding to biomolecules such as DNA and thus can serve as biosensors [2], (iii) gold has important potential applications in nanoelectronics [3,4], and (iv) gold clusters and gold-containing compounds possess unique chemical properties [5]. All these golden discoveries have made gold a surprising and rewarding subject of investigation in nanoscience and cluster science. Indeed, some of our oldest notions regarding gold, such as its inertness, are being changed dramatically by the recent findings in nanogold.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
921425
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-53621
7201; 25392; KP1704020; TRN: US200804%%809
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Atomic Clusters: From Gas Phase To Deposited (The Chemical Physics of Solid Surfaces), 12:91-150
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ALLOYS; CHEMICAL PROPERTIES; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; DNA; GOLD; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Zhai, Hua-jin, Li, Xi, and Wang, Lai S. Probing the Unique Size-Dependent Properties of Small Au Clusters, Au Alloy Clusters, and CO Chemisorbed Au Clusters in the Gas Phase. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Zhai, Hua-jin, Li, Xi, & Wang, Lai S. Probing the Unique Size-Dependent Properties of Small Au Clusters, Au Alloy Clusters, and CO Chemisorbed Au Clusters in the Gas Phase. United States.
Zhai, Hua-jin, Li, Xi, and Wang, Lai S. Sun . "Probing the Unique Size-Dependent Properties of Small Au Clusters, Au Alloy Clusters, and CO Chemisorbed Au Clusters in the Gas Phase". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_921425,
title = {Probing the Unique Size-Dependent Properties of Small Au Clusters, Au Alloy Clusters, and CO Chemisorbed Au Clusters in the Gas Phase},
author = {Zhai, Hua-jin and Li, Xi and Wang, Lai S.},
abstractNote = {When materials are reduced in size to the nanometer scale, their physical and chemical properties undergo major changes and become size-dependent, forming the foundation for nanoscience and nanotechnology. Gold nanoparticles and small gold clusters have been the focus of intensive research activities lately. The modern “goldrush” is largely motivated by the recent discoveries that (i) nanogold shows unexpected catalytic properties for a wide spectrum of chemical reactions [1], (ii) nanogold enables selective binding to biomolecules such as DNA and thus can serve as biosensors [2], (iii) gold has important potential applications in nanoelectronics [3,4], and (iv) gold clusters and gold-containing compounds possess unique chemical properties [5]. All these golden discoveries have made gold a surprising and rewarding subject of investigation in nanoscience and cluster science. Indeed, some of our oldest notions regarding gold, such as its inertness, are being changed dramatically by the recent findings in nanogold.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Book:
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