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Title: Climate Change and the Long-Term Evolution of the U.S. Buildings Sector

Abstract

This paper discusses a new U.S. building module in the MiniCAM integrated assessment model, and it presents a scenario based on that module.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
921267
Report Number(s):
PNNL-16869
EB2102010; TRN: US200803%%181
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 03 NATURAL GAS; AVAILABILITY; CARBON; CLIMATES; ELECTRICITY; ENERGY DEMAND; FUEL OILS; HEATING; NATURAL GAS; integrated assessment; buildings; energy

Citation Formats

Rong, Fang, Clarke, Leon E., and Smith, Steven J.. Climate Change and the Long-Term Evolution of the U.S. Buildings Sector. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/921267.
Rong, Fang, Clarke, Leon E., & Smith, Steven J.. Climate Change and the Long-Term Evolution of the U.S. Buildings Sector. United States. doi:10.2172/921267.
Rong, Fang, Clarke, Leon E., and Smith, Steven J.. Sun . "Climate Change and the Long-Term Evolution of the U.S. Buildings Sector". United States. doi:10.2172/921267. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/921267.
@article{osti_921267,
title = {Climate Change and the Long-Term Evolution of the U.S. Buildings Sector},
author = {Rong, Fang and Clarke, Leon E. and Smith, Steven J.},
abstractNote = {This paper discusses a new U.S. building module in the MiniCAM integrated assessment model, and it presents a scenario based on that module.},
doi = {10.2172/921267},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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