skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Correlation between fundamental binding forces and clinical prognosis of Staphylococcus aureus infections of medical implants

Abstract

Implanted medical devices (e.g., prosthetic heart valves, permanent pacemakers) significantly improve the quality of life for many humans. However, a common clinical observation is that such devices become colonized with potentially life-threatening Staphylococcus aureus biofilms, which are difficult to combat with host defenses or antibiotics. This study attempts to draw a correlation between the clinical outcome of patients with implanted cardiac devices and the fundamental binding forces ultimately responsible for the initiation of an S. aureus biofilm in-situ. Atomic force microscopy was used to measure forces between a fibronectin-coated probe (simulating a prosthetic implant) and 15 different strains of S. aureus isolated from either patients with infected cardiac devices (invasive population) or healthy human subjects (control population). The fibronectin-coated probe was repeatedly brought into and out of contact with a bacterium’s surface, “fishing” for a reaction with the cell’s fibronectin-binding proteins. More than 40,000 force profiles were measured on 5-10 different cells for each of the 15 clinical strains. A unique force-signature was observed for a binding event between the fibronectin-coated probe and the bacteria. When grouped by the frequency of this force-signature, there was a strong distinction (p=0.01) between the invasive and control populations of S. aureus. This discoverymore » suggests that biofilm forming bacteria may be classified according to their “force taxonomy”, which could have a positive effect on health care as it bridges the long-standing disconnect between macroscopic, clinical investigations and nanometer-scale forces ultimately responsible for a bond between S. aureus and the surface of a prosthetic device.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
920969
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-51371
19602; KC0303020
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Langmuir, 23(5):2289-2292
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Yongsunthon, Ruchirej, Fowler, Vance, Lower, Brian H., Vellano, Francis P., Alexander, Emily, Reller, L. Barth, Corey, G. Ralph, and Lower, Steven. Correlation between fundamental binding forces and clinical prognosis of Staphylococcus aureus infections of medical implants. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1021/la063117v.
Yongsunthon, Ruchirej, Fowler, Vance, Lower, Brian H., Vellano, Francis P., Alexander, Emily, Reller, L. Barth, Corey, G. Ralph, & Lower, Steven. Correlation between fundamental binding forces and clinical prognosis of Staphylococcus aureus infections of medical implants. United States. doi:10.1021/la063117v.
Yongsunthon, Ruchirej, Fowler, Vance, Lower, Brian H., Vellano, Francis P., Alexander, Emily, Reller, L. Barth, Corey, G. Ralph, and Lower, Steven. Thu . "Correlation between fundamental binding forces and clinical prognosis of Staphylococcus aureus infections of medical implants". United States. doi:10.1021/la063117v.
@article{osti_920969,
title = {Correlation between fundamental binding forces and clinical prognosis of Staphylococcus aureus infections of medical implants},
author = {Yongsunthon, Ruchirej and Fowler, Vance and Lower, Brian H. and Vellano, Francis P. and Alexander, Emily and Reller, L. Barth and Corey, G. Ralph and Lower, Steven},
abstractNote = {Implanted medical devices (e.g., prosthetic heart valves, permanent pacemakers) significantly improve the quality of life for many humans. However, a common clinical observation is that such devices become colonized with potentially life-threatening Staphylococcus aureus biofilms, which are difficult to combat with host defenses or antibiotics. This study attempts to draw a correlation between the clinical outcome of patients with implanted cardiac devices and the fundamental binding forces ultimately responsible for the initiation of an S. aureus biofilm in-situ. Atomic force microscopy was used to measure forces between a fibronectin-coated probe (simulating a prosthetic implant) and 15 different strains of S. aureus isolated from either patients with infected cardiac devices (invasive population) or healthy human subjects (control population). The fibronectin-coated probe was repeatedly brought into and out of contact with a bacterium’s surface, “fishing” for a reaction with the cell’s fibronectin-binding proteins. More than 40,000 force profiles were measured on 5-10 different cells for each of the 15 clinical strains. A unique force-signature was observed for a binding event between the fibronectin-coated probe and the bacteria. When grouped by the frequency of this force-signature, there was a strong distinction (p=0.01) between the invasive and control populations of S. aureus. This discovery suggests that biofilm forming bacteria may be classified according to their “force taxonomy”, which could have a positive effect on health care as it bridges the long-standing disconnect between macroscopic, clinical investigations and nanometer-scale forces ultimately responsible for a bond between S. aureus and the surface of a prosthetic device.},
doi = {10.1021/la063117v},
journal = {Langmuir, 23(5):2289-2292},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}