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Title: Benchmarking and Self-Assessment in the Wine Industry

Abstract

Not all industrial facilities have the staff or theopportunity to perform a detailed audit of their operations. The lack ofknowledge of energy efficiency opportunities provides an importantbarrier to improving efficiency. Benchmarking programs in the U.S. andabroad have shown to improve knowledge of the energy performance ofindustrial facilities and buildings and to fuel energy managementpractices. Benchmarking provides a fair way to compare the energyintensity of plants, while accounting for structural differences (e.g.,the mix of products produced, climate conditions) between differentfacilities. In California, the winemaking industry is not only one of theeconomic pillars of the economy; it is also a large energy consumer, witha considerable potential for energy-efficiency improvement. LawrenceBerkeley National Laboratory and Fetzer Vineyards developed the firstbenchmarking tool for the California wine industry called "BEST(Benchmarking and Energy and water Savings Tool) Winery". BEST Wineryenables a winery to compare its energy efficiency to a best practicereference winery. Besides overall performance, the tool enables the userto evaluate the impact of implementing efficiency measures. The toolfacilitates strategic planning of efficiency measures, based on theestimated impact of the measures, their costs and savings. The tool willraise awareness of current energy intensities and offer an efficient wayto evaluate the impact of future efficiency measures.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; California Energy Commission
OSTI Identifier:
920246
Report Number(s):
LBNL-59957
R&D Project: E15601; TRN: US200818%%1105
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proceedings of the 2005 ACEEE Summer Study onEnergy Efficiency in Industry, West Point, New York, July 19-22,2005
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32; 29; AUDITS; CALIFORNIA; CLIMATES; ECONOMICS; EFFICIENCY; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; ENERGY MANAGEMENT; PERFORMANCE; PLANNING; WATER; GRAPES; Best Practice Benchmarking Winery Energy efficiency

Citation Formats

Galitsky, Christina, Radspieler, Anthony, Worrell, Ernst, Healy,Patrick, and Zechiel, Susanne. Benchmarking and Self-Assessment in the Wine Industry. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.2172/862318.
Galitsky, Christina, Radspieler, Anthony, Worrell, Ernst, Healy,Patrick, & Zechiel, Susanne. Benchmarking and Self-Assessment in the Wine Industry. United States. doi:10.2172/862318.
Galitsky, Christina, Radspieler, Anthony, Worrell, Ernst, Healy,Patrick, and Zechiel, Susanne. Thu . "Benchmarking and Self-Assessment in the Wine Industry". United States. doi:10.2172/862318. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/920246.
@article{osti_920246,
title = {Benchmarking and Self-Assessment in the Wine Industry},
author = {Galitsky, Christina and Radspieler, Anthony and Worrell, Ernst and Healy,Patrick and Zechiel, Susanne},
abstractNote = {Not all industrial facilities have the staff or theopportunity to perform a detailed audit of their operations. The lack ofknowledge of energy efficiency opportunities provides an importantbarrier to improving efficiency. Benchmarking programs in the U.S. andabroad have shown to improve knowledge of the energy performance ofindustrial facilities and buildings and to fuel energy managementpractices. Benchmarking provides a fair way to compare the energyintensity of plants, while accounting for structural differences (e.g.,the mix of products produced, climate conditions) between differentfacilities. In California, the winemaking industry is not only one of theeconomic pillars of the economy; it is also a large energy consumer, witha considerable potential for energy-efficiency improvement. LawrenceBerkeley National Laboratory and Fetzer Vineyards developed the firstbenchmarking tool for the California wine industry called "BEST(Benchmarking and Energy and water Savings Tool) Winery". BEST Wineryenables a winery to compare its energy efficiency to a best practicereference winery. Besides overall performance, the tool enables the userto evaluate the impact of implementing efficiency measures. The toolfacilitates strategic planning of efficiency measures, based on theestimated impact of the measures, their costs and savings. The tool willraise awareness of current energy intensities and offer an efficient wayto evaluate the impact of future efficiency measures.},
doi = {10.2172/862318},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Thu Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}

Conference:
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