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Title: Report on efforts to model and replicate the paths of the CarbonExplorers deployed April 2001 (NOAA GC04-304 (James Bishop, PI)

Abstract

This report is intended to document the efforts I made tomodel the North Pacific in order to understand the path of the CarbonExplorers, deployed April 10, 2001. Interestingly, these floats movedwestward and northward in the first two months after deployment at OceanStation PAPA (hereafter, OSP), rather than eastward as expected. Myintent was to force the model with the observed winds and temperatures inorder to replicate the path of the floats during this time period. I thenwanted to compare these paths with the conditions in 2003, when thefloats took a more accelerated path and saw different biomass signatures.Unfortunately, I was never able to replicate the path of the 2001 floats:the model floats always went eastward. So, this report is a documentationof what I tried, some thoughts about why I was not successful, and afinal section explaining where the files are located at NERSC, in casesomeone else wants to expand on the current work.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
COLLABORATION - UCBerkeley
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Director, Office of Science
OSTI Identifier:
920067
Report Number(s):
LBNL-61162
R&D Project: G2W030; BnR: 400402000; TRN: US200825%%412
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; BIOMASS; CARBON; DOCUMENTATION

Citation Formats

Henning, Cara. Report on efforts to model and replicate the paths of the CarbonExplorers deployed April 2001 (NOAA GC04-304 (James Bishop, PI). United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/920067.
Henning, Cara. Report on efforts to model and replicate the paths of the CarbonExplorers deployed April 2001 (NOAA GC04-304 (James Bishop, PI). United States. doi:10.2172/920067.
Henning, Cara. Sun . "Report on efforts to model and replicate the paths of the CarbonExplorers deployed April 2001 (NOAA GC04-304 (James Bishop, PI)". United States. doi:10.2172/920067. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/920067.
@article{osti_920067,
title = {Report on efforts to model and replicate the paths of the CarbonExplorers deployed April 2001 (NOAA GC04-304 (James Bishop, PI)},
author = {Henning, Cara},
abstractNote = {This report is intended to document the efforts I made tomodel the North Pacific in order to understand the path of the CarbonExplorers, deployed April 10, 2001. Interestingly, these floats movedwestward and northward in the first two months after deployment at OceanStation PAPA (hereafter, OSP), rather than eastward as expected. Myintent was to force the model with the observed winds and temperatures inorder to replicate the path of the floats during this time period. I thenwanted to compare these paths with the conditions in 2003, when thefloats took a more accelerated path and saw different biomass signatures.Unfortunately, I was never able to replicate the path of the 2001 floats:the model floats always went eastward. So, this report is a documentationof what I tried, some thoughts about why I was not successful, and afinal section explaining where the files are located at NERSC, in casesomeone else wants to expand on the current work.},
doi = {10.2172/920067},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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