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Title: Anomalous compression behavior in lanthanum/cerium-based metallic glasses under high pressure.

Abstract

In situ high-pressure x-ray diffraction, low-temperature resistivity, and magnetization experiments were performed on a La{sub 32}Ce{sub 32}Al{sub 16}Ni{sub 5}Cu{sub 15} bulk metallic glass (BMG). A sudden change in compressibility at {approx}14 GPa and a rapid increase of resistivity at {approx}12 K were detected, whereas magnetic phase transformation and magnetic field dependence of the low-temperature resistivity do not occur at temperatures down to 4.2 K. An interaction between conduction electrons and the two-level systems is suggested to explain the temperature and field dependences of resistivity of the BMG alloy. Although the cause of the unusual change in compressibility at {approx}14 GPa is not clear, we believe that it could be linked with the unique electron structure of cerium in the amorphous matrix. An electronic phase transition in BMG alloys, most likely a second-order amorphous-to-amorphous phase transition, is suggested.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); National Natural Science Foundation of China (NNSFC); Ministry of Science and Technology of China Grants; Ministry of China Education Grants; Zhejiang Univ. - Helmholtz Corp. Fund
OSTI Identifier:
919995
Report Number(s):
ANL/XSD/JA-60498
Journal ID: ISSN 0027-8424; PNASA6; TRN: US0806545
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.; Journal Volume: 104; Journal Issue: 34 ; 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ALLOYS; CERIUM; COMPRESSIBILITY; COMPRESSION; ELECTRONS; GLASS; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MAGNETIZATION; METALLIC GLASSES; PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS; X-RAY DIFFRACTION

Citation Formats

Zeng, Q. S., Li, Y. C., Feng, C. M., Liermann, P., Somayazulu, M., Shen, G. Y., Mao, H. K., Ren, Y., Liu, J., Hu, T. D., Jiang, J. Z., ICNSM and Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, Zhejiang Univ., Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Carnegie Inst. of Washington. Anomalous compression behavior in lanthanum/cerium-based metallic glasses under high pressure.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1073/pnas.0705999104.
Zeng, Q. S., Li, Y. C., Feng, C. M., Liermann, P., Somayazulu, M., Shen, G. Y., Mao, H. K., Ren, Y., Liu, J., Hu, T. D., Jiang, J. Z., ICNSM and Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, Zhejiang Univ., Chinese Academy of Sciences, & Carnegie Inst. of Washington. Anomalous compression behavior in lanthanum/cerium-based metallic glasses under high pressure.. United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.0705999104.
Zeng, Q. S., Li, Y. C., Feng, C. M., Liermann, P., Somayazulu, M., Shen, G. Y., Mao, H. K., Ren, Y., Liu, J., Hu, T. D., Jiang, J. Z., ICNSM and Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, Zhejiang Univ., Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Carnegie Inst. of Washington. Mon . "Anomalous compression behavior in lanthanum/cerium-based metallic glasses under high pressure.". United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.0705999104.
@article{osti_919995,
title = {Anomalous compression behavior in lanthanum/cerium-based metallic glasses under high pressure.},
author = {Zeng, Q. S. and Li, Y. C. and Feng, C. M. and Liermann, P. and Somayazulu, M. and Shen, G. Y. and Mao, H. K. and Ren, Y. and Liu, J. and Hu, T. D. and Jiang, J. Z. and ICNSM and Laboratory of New-Structured Materials and Zhejiang Univ. and Chinese Academy of Sciences and Carnegie Inst. of Washington},
abstractNote = {In situ high-pressure x-ray diffraction, low-temperature resistivity, and magnetization experiments were performed on a La{sub 32}Ce{sub 32}Al{sub 16}Ni{sub 5}Cu{sub 15} bulk metallic glass (BMG). A sudden change in compressibility at {approx}14 GPa and a rapid increase of resistivity at {approx}12 K were detected, whereas magnetic phase transformation and magnetic field dependence of the low-temperature resistivity do not occur at temperatures down to 4.2 K. An interaction between conduction electrons and the two-level systems is suggested to explain the temperature and field dependences of resistivity of the BMG alloy. Although the cause of the unusual change in compressibility at {approx}14 GPa is not clear, we believe that it could be linked with the unique electron structure of cerium in the amorphous matrix. An electronic phase transition in BMG alloys, most likely a second-order amorphous-to-amorphous phase transition, is suggested.},
doi = {10.1073/pnas.0705999104},
journal = {Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.},
number = 34 ; 2007,
volume = 104,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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