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Title: A 3D Model for Ion Beam Formation and Transport Simulation

Abstract

In this paper, we present a three-dimensional model forself-consistently modeling ion beam formation from plasma ion sources andtransporting in low energy beam transport systems. A multi-sectionoverlapped computational domain has been used to break the originaltransport system into a number of weakly coupled subsystems. Within eachsubsystem, macro-particle tracking is used to obtain the charge densitydistribution in this subdomain. The three-dimensional Poisson equation issolved within the subdomain after each particle tracking to obtain theself-consistent space-charge forces and the particle tracking is repeateduntil the solution converges. Two new Poisson solvers based on acombination of the spectral method and the finite difference multigridmethod have been developed to solve the Poisson equation in cylindricalcoordinates for the straight beam transport section and in Frenet-Serretcoordinates for the bending magnet section. This model can have importantapplication in design and optimization of the low energy beam line opticsof the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) front end.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Director. Office of Science. High EnergyPhysics
OSTI Identifier:
919827
Report Number(s):
LBNL-59586
Journal ID: ISSN 0010-4655; CPHCBZ; R&D Project: 453401; BnR: KA1401030; TRN: US0806505
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Computer Physics Communications; Journal Volume: 175; Journal Issue: 6; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 09/15/2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; BEAM TRANSPORT; CHARGE DENSITY; ION BEAMS; ION SOURCES; POISSON EQUATION; SIMULATION; SPACE CHARGE; TRANSPORT; ion beam formation ion beam transport 3d beamsimulation

Citation Formats

Qiang, J., Todd, D., and Leitner, D. A 3D Model for Ion Beam Formation and Transport Simulation. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.cpc.2006.05.007.
Qiang, J., Todd, D., & Leitner, D. A 3D Model for Ion Beam Formation and Transport Simulation. United States. doi:10.1016/j.cpc.2006.05.007.
Qiang, J., Todd, D., and Leitner, D. Tue . "A 3D Model for Ion Beam Formation and Transport Simulation". United States. doi:10.1016/j.cpc.2006.05.007. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/919827.
@article{osti_919827,
title = {A 3D Model for Ion Beam Formation and Transport Simulation},
author = {Qiang, J. and Todd, D. and Leitner, D.},
abstractNote = {In this paper, we present a three-dimensional model forself-consistently modeling ion beam formation from plasma ion sources andtransporting in low energy beam transport systems. A multi-sectionoverlapped computational domain has been used to break the originaltransport system into a number of weakly coupled subsystems. Within eachsubsystem, macro-particle tracking is used to obtain the charge densitydistribution in this subdomain. The three-dimensional Poisson equation issolved within the subdomain after each particle tracking to obtain theself-consistent space-charge forces and the particle tracking is repeateduntil the solution converges. Two new Poisson solvers based on acombination of the spectral method and the finite difference multigridmethod have been developed to solve the Poisson equation in cylindricalcoordinates for the straight beam transport section and in Frenet-Serretcoordinates for the bending magnet section. This model can have importantapplication in design and optimization of the low energy beam line opticsof the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) front end.},
doi = {10.1016/j.cpc.2006.05.007},
journal = {Computer Physics Communications},
number = 6,
volume = 175,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Feb 07 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Tue Feb 07 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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