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Title: Gapless superconductivity and the Fermi arc in the cuprates.

Abstract

We argue that the Fermi arc observed in angle-resolved photoemission measurements in underdoped cuprates can be understood as a consequence of inelastic scattering in a phase-disordered d-wave superconductor. We analyze this phenomenon in the context of strong-coupling Eliashberg theory, deriving a 'single-lifetime' model for describing the temperature evolution of the spectral gap as measured by single-particle probes such as photoemission and tunneling.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
919732
Report Number(s):
ANL/MSD/JA-60414
TRN: US200822%%479
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Phys. Rev. B; Journal Volume: 76; Journal Issue: 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CUPRATES; INELASTIC SCATTERING; PHOTOEMISSION; PROBES; SUPERCONDUCTIVITY; FERMI LEVEL; MATHEMATICAL MODELS

Citation Formats

Chubukov, A. V., Norman, M. R., Millis, A. J., Abrahams, E., Materials Science Division, Univ. Wisconsin-Madison, Columbia Univ., and Rutgers Univ. Gapless superconductivity and the Fermi arc in the cuprates.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.76.180501.
Chubukov, A. V., Norman, M. R., Millis, A. J., Abrahams, E., Materials Science Division, Univ. Wisconsin-Madison, Columbia Univ., & Rutgers Univ. Gapless superconductivity and the Fermi arc in the cuprates.. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.76.180501.
Chubukov, A. V., Norman, M. R., Millis, A. J., Abrahams, E., Materials Science Division, Univ. Wisconsin-Madison, Columbia Univ., and Rutgers Univ. Mon . "Gapless superconductivity and the Fermi arc in the cuprates.". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.76.180501.
@article{osti_919732,
title = {Gapless superconductivity and the Fermi arc in the cuprates.},
author = {Chubukov, A. V. and Norman, M. R. and Millis, A. J. and Abrahams, E. and Materials Science Division and Univ. Wisconsin-Madison and Columbia Univ. and Rutgers Univ.},
abstractNote = {We argue that the Fermi arc observed in angle-resolved photoemission measurements in underdoped cuprates can be understood as a consequence of inelastic scattering in a phase-disordered d-wave superconductor. We analyze this phenomenon in the context of strong-coupling Eliashberg theory, deriving a 'single-lifetime' model for describing the temperature evolution of the spectral gap as measured by single-particle probes such as photoemission and tunneling.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevB.76.180501},
journal = {Phys. Rev. B},
number = 2007,
volume = 76,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Angle resolved photoemission data in the pseudogap phase of underdoped cuprates have revealed the presence of a truncated Fermi surface consisting of Fermi arcs. We compare a number of proposed models for the arcs, and find that the one that best models the data is a d-wave energy gap with a lifetime broadening whose temperature dependence is suggestive of fluctuating pairs.
  • The authors have separated a hole carrier and a localized spin, by treating the exchange interaction between the spins of a carrier hole and a localized spin in a mean field sense. Then they have constructed the effective one-electron-type band structure for the hole carriers in the presence of the antiferromagnetic (AF) ordering of the localized spins. In the case of the undoped La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} all the energy bands are fully occupied by electrons so that La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} is an insulator. In this sense the present energy bands which include the many body effect fully is completely differentmore » from the ordinary energy band in the local density functional method. The top of the highest valence band is at ({pi}/a, {pi}/a, 0)-point, and the calculated Fermi surface is small as far as the spin correlation length of the AF order is larger than the mean free path. Based on this energy band and Fermi surfaces the authors have calculated various normal state properties and explained their anomalous features, such as the x-dependence of the electronic specific heat, the linear temperature dependence of the resistivity down to {Tc}, the x-dependence of the Hall coefficient with the sign change, the large T dependence of R{sub H}, the incommensurate peak of the neutron scattering and the instability at x = 0.125.« less
  • The authors give a brief review of high-magnetic-field quantum-oscillation measurements on cuprate superconductors. In the case of the underdoped cuprates, a number of small Fermi-surface pockets are observed, probably due to the incommensurate nesting of the predicted (large) hole Fermi surface. The Fermi-surface instabilities that drive this nesting are also likely to result in the incommensurate spin fluctuations observed in inelastic neutron-scattering measurements. They suggest that the unusually high superconducting transitions in the cuprates are driven by an exact mapping of these incommensurate spin fluctuations onto the d{sub x{sup 2}-y{sup 2}} Cooper-pair wavefunction. The maximum energy of the fluctuations {approx}more » 100s of Kelvin gives an appropriate energy scale for the superconducting transition temperature.« less
  • La 2-xSr xCuO 4/La 2CuO 4 bilayers show interface superconductivity that originates from accumulation and depletion of mobile charge carriers across the interface. Surprisingly, the doping level can be varied broadly (within the interval 0.15 < x < 0.47) without affecting the transition temperature, which stays essentially constant and equal to that in optimally doped material, T c ≈ 40 K. Here we argue that this finding implies that doping up to the optimum level does not shift the chemical potential, unlike in ordinary Fermi liquids. Lastly, we discuss possible physical scenarios that can give doping-independent chemical potential in themore » pseudogap regime: electronic phase separation, formation of charge-density waves, strong Coulomb interactions, or self-trapping of mobile charge carriers.« less