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Title: Solid-particle erosion of tungsten carbide/cobalt cermet vs. hardened AISI 440C stainless steel.

Abstract

Solid-particle erosion tests were conducted on hardened AISI 440C stainless steel and a cermet that consisted of {approx}90 vol.% submicrometer WC embedded in {approx}10 vol.% Co. Angular Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} abrasives were used as the erodent. Experimental variables were: angle of impact = 20, 50, or 90 degrees; erodent velocity = 60 or 120 m/s; erodent nominal diameter = 63 or 143 {micro}m. For all test conditions, the stainless steel eroded faster than the cermet. Analysis of weight-loss data and examination of eroded surfaces by scanning electron microscopy indicated that the erosion mechanisms were similar for the two hard materials. Both exhibited significant plasticity when impacted, but the stainless steel's response to impact appeared to have been more ductile in nature.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
OUS; EE
OSTI Identifier:
919321
Report Number(s):
ANL/ET/JA-54222
Journal ID: ISSN 0043-1648; WEARAH; TRN: US0806350
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Wear; Journal Volume: 261; Journal Issue: 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ABRASIVES; CERMETS; PLASTICITY; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; STAINLESS STEELS; TUNGSTEN; VELOCITY

Citation Formats

Rateick, R. G., Jr., Karasek, K. R., Cunningham, A., Goretta, K. C., Routbort, J. L., Energy Technology, and Honeywell. Solid-particle erosion of tungsten carbide/cobalt cermet vs. hardened AISI 440C stainless steel.. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.wear.2006.01.012.
Rateick, R. G., Jr., Karasek, K. R., Cunningham, A., Goretta, K. C., Routbort, J. L., Energy Technology, & Honeywell. Solid-particle erosion of tungsten carbide/cobalt cermet vs. hardened AISI 440C stainless steel.. United States. doi:10.1016/j.wear.2006.01.012.
Rateick, R. G., Jr., Karasek, K. R., Cunningham, A., Goretta, K. C., Routbort, J. L., Energy Technology, and Honeywell. Sun . "Solid-particle erosion of tungsten carbide/cobalt cermet vs. hardened AISI 440C stainless steel.". United States. doi:10.1016/j.wear.2006.01.012.
@article{osti_919321,
title = {Solid-particle erosion of tungsten carbide/cobalt cermet vs. hardened AISI 440C stainless steel.},
author = {Rateick, R. G., Jr. and Karasek, K. R. and Cunningham, A. and Goretta, K. C. and Routbort, J. L. and Energy Technology and Honeywell},
abstractNote = {Solid-particle erosion tests were conducted on hardened AISI 440C stainless steel and a cermet that consisted of {approx}90 vol.% submicrometer WC embedded in {approx}10 vol.% Co. Angular Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} abrasives were used as the erodent. Experimental variables were: angle of impact = 20, 50, or 90 degrees; erodent velocity = 60 or 120 m/s; erodent nominal diameter = 63 or 143 {micro}m. For all test conditions, the stainless steel eroded faster than the cermet. Analysis of weight-loss data and examination of eroded surfaces by scanning electron microscopy indicated that the erosion mechanisms were similar for the two hard materials. Both exhibited significant plasticity when impacted, but the stainless steel's response to impact appeared to have been more ductile in nature.},
doi = {10.1016/j.wear.2006.01.012},
journal = {Wear},
number = 2006,
volume = 261,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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