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Title: Possible evidence for dark matter annihilations from the excess microwave emission around the center of the Galaxy seen by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
919099
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-PUB-07-131-A
arXiv eprint number arXiv:0705.3655
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Phys.Rev.D76:083012,2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; Astrophysics

Citation Formats

Hooper, Dan, /Fermilab, Finkbeiner, Douglas P., Dobler, Gregory, and /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. Possible evidence for dark matter annihilations from the excess microwave emission around the center of the Galaxy seen by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.76.083012.
Hooper, Dan, /Fermilab, Finkbeiner, Douglas P., Dobler, Gregory, & /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. Possible evidence for dark matter annihilations from the excess microwave emission around the center of the Galaxy seen by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.76.083012.
Hooper, Dan, /Fermilab, Finkbeiner, Douglas P., Dobler, Gregory, and /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. Tue . "Possible evidence for dark matter annihilations from the excess microwave emission around the center of the Galaxy seen by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.76.083012.
@article{osti_919099,
title = {Possible evidence for dark matter annihilations from the excess microwave emission around the center of the Galaxy seen by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe},
author = {Hooper, Dan and /Fermilab and Finkbeiner, Douglas P. and Dobler, Gregory and /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevD.76.083012},
journal = {Phys.Rev.D76:083012,2007},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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