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Title: Amine Functionalized Nanoporous Materials for Carbon Dioxide Capture

Abstract

Increasing CO2 concentration level in the earth atmosphere and rising global average temperature have raised serious concerns about the effects of anthropogenic CO2 on global climate change. Meanwhile, most analyses project that fossil fuels will continue to be the dominant energy source world wide until at least the middle of the twenty first century. Significant reduction from the current level of CO2 emission due to the consumption of fossil fuels is necessary to stabilize atmospheric concentration of CO2. The focus of this chapter will be on the CO2 capture technologies related to energy production from fossil fuels, as over one third of the world’s CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel use are attributed to fossil-fuel electric power-generation plants. Solid amine sorbents have promise to overcome some of the shortcomings of liquid amines for CO2 capture in energy production. The dispersion, immobilization, and confinement of the amine functional groups into a porous solid support can result in a more stable, more mass transfer efficient, less toxic, and less corrosive material than the corresponding liquid amines. Solid amine sorbents allow a dry scrubbing process where the energy penalty associated with the evaporation of a large amount of water is avoided. Further, the amine functionalmore » groups can be tailored for lower regeneration energy requirement. The supports can be tailored independently for high stability and low mass transfer resistance. This book chapter deals with the topics of solid amine sorbents (both supported and tethered amines) as the functional materials for CO2 separation. The design rational and the performance of such materials are discussed in detail. The state of the art in the synthesis and the CO2 capture performance of solid amine sorbent is reviewed.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
918845
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-50728
12302; 3681; 6896; 6893; TRN: US200819%%473
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Environmental Applications of Nanomaterials: Synthesis, Sorbents and Sensors, 285-312
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; AMINES; CARBON DIOXIDE; CLIMATIC CHANGE; EARTH ATMOSPHERE; ENERGY SOURCES; FOSSIL FUELS; MASS TRANSFER; POWER GENERATION; CO2 capture; solide amine sorbents; carbon capture; mesoporous silica; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Zheng, Feng, Addleman, Raymond S., Aardahl, Chris L., Fryxell, Glen E., Brown, Daryl R., and Zemanian, Thomas S.. Amine Functionalized Nanoporous Materials for Carbon Dioxide Capture. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Zheng, Feng, Addleman, Raymond S., Aardahl, Chris L., Fryxell, Glen E., Brown, Daryl R., & Zemanian, Thomas S.. Amine Functionalized Nanoporous Materials for Carbon Dioxide Capture. United States.
Zheng, Feng, Addleman, Raymond S., Aardahl, Chris L., Fryxell, Glen E., Brown, Daryl R., and Zemanian, Thomas S.. Wed . "Amine Functionalized Nanoporous Materials for Carbon Dioxide Capture". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_918845,
title = {Amine Functionalized Nanoporous Materials for Carbon Dioxide Capture},
author = {Zheng, Feng and Addleman, Raymond S. and Aardahl, Chris L. and Fryxell, Glen E. and Brown, Daryl R. and Zemanian, Thomas S.},
abstractNote = {Increasing CO2 concentration level in the earth atmosphere and rising global average temperature have raised serious concerns about the effects of anthropogenic CO2 on global climate change. Meanwhile, most analyses project that fossil fuels will continue to be the dominant energy source world wide until at least the middle of the twenty first century. Significant reduction from the current level of CO2 emission due to the consumption of fossil fuels is necessary to stabilize atmospheric concentration of CO2. The focus of this chapter will be on the CO2 capture technologies related to energy production from fossil fuels, as over one third of the world’s CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel use are attributed to fossil-fuel electric power-generation plants. Solid amine sorbents have promise to overcome some of the shortcomings of liquid amines for CO2 capture in energy production. The dispersion, immobilization, and confinement of the amine functional groups into a porous solid support can result in a more stable, more mass transfer efficient, less toxic, and less corrosive material than the corresponding liquid amines. Solid amine sorbents allow a dry scrubbing process where the energy penalty associated with the evaporation of a large amount of water is avoided. Further, the amine functional groups can be tailored for lower regeneration energy requirement. The supports can be tailored independently for high stability and low mass transfer resistance. This book chapter deals with the topics of solid amine sorbents (both supported and tethered amines) as the functional materials for CO2 separation. The design rational and the performance of such materials are discussed in detail. The state of the art in the synthesis and the CO2 capture performance of solid amine sorbent is reviewed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Apr 04 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Wed Apr 04 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

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  • Highlights: • Synthesis of the micro-mesoporous composite materials of ZSM-12/MCM-48 type. • Application of these adsorbents in the carbon dioxide adsorption. • Effects of the contents of zeolite and amino group in the material surface on the CO{sub 2} capture efficiency. - Abstract: In this study ZSM-12/MCM-48 adsorbents have been synthesized at three ZSM-12 content, and also were functionalizated with amine groups by grafting. All the adsorbents synthesized were evaluated for CO{sub 2} capture. The X-ray diffraction analysis of the ZSM-12/MCM-48 composite showed the main characteristic peaks of ZSM-12 and MCM-48, and after the functionalization, the structure of MCM-48 onmore » the composite impregnated was affected due amine presence. For the composites without amine, the ZSM-12 content was the factor determining in the adsorption capacity of CO{sub 2} and for the composites with amine the amount of amine was that influenced in the adsorption capacity.« less
  • The goal of this study was to assess the technical and economic feasibility of options for reducing CO{sub 2} emissions from an advanced High Performance Power System (HIPPS) through CO{sub 2} capture. Two approaches to CO{sub 2} capture were examined: (1) removing CO{sub 2} from the flue gas prior to exiting the stack and (2) using oxygen-based combustion to produced and capture a CO{sub 2}-rich flue gas. The addition of a CO{sub 2} scrubbing technology to a HIPPS plant reduced net power/efficiency by 19%; increased the cost of electricity by 42%; and captured 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced bymore » the plant. Two different oxygen-based scenarios resulted in a 16% and 26% reduction in net power/efficiency; a 21% and 34% increase in the cost of electricity; and CO{sub 2} emissions reduction from the plant of 77% and 100%. An externality cost analysis showed that a break-even cost of electricity could be achieved with CO{sub 2} externality costs of $25--40/ton of CO{sub 2} emitted. Compared with CO{sub 2} capture form other power plants, the HIPPS scenarios exhibited higher thermal efficiencies than a pulverized-coal plant, equivalent thermal efficiencies to integrated gasification combined cycle plants, and lower thermal efficiencies than fuel cell power plants. The HIPPS plant provided a benefit over these plants regarding CO{sub 2} capture due to its ability to recover 100% of plant emission.« less
  • Aside from the target storage regions being underground, geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) and radioactive waste disposal (RWD) share little in common in North America. The large volume of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) needed to be sequestered along with its relatively benign health effects present a sharp contrast to the limited volumes and hazardous nature of high-level radioactive waste (RW). There is well-documented capacity in North America for 100 years or more of sequestration of CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plants. Aside from economics, the challenges of GCS include lack of fully established legal and regulatory framework for ownership of injectedmore » CO{sub 2}, the need for an expanded pipeline infrastructure, and public acceptance of the technology. As for RW, the USA had proposed the unsaturated tuffs of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as the region's first high-level RWD site before removing it from consideration in early 2009. The Canadian RW program is currently evolving with options that range from geologic disposal to both decentralized and centralized permanent storage in surface facilities. Both the USA and Canada have established legal and regulatory frameworks for RWD. The most challenging technical issue for RWD is the need to predict repository performance on extremely long time scales (10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} years). While attitudes toward nuclear power are rapidly changing as fossil-fuel costs soar and changes in climate occur, public perception remains the most serious challenge to opening RW repositories. Because of the many significant differences between RWD and GCS, there is little that can be shared between them from regulatory, legal, transportation, or economic perspectives. As for public perception, there is currently an opportunity to engage the public on the benefits and risks of both GCS and RWD as they learn more about the urgent energy-climate crisis created by greenhouse gas emissions from current fossil-fuel combustion practices.« less
  • This Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report provides information for policymakers, scientists and engineers in the field of climate change and reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions. It describes sources, capture, transport, and storage of CO{sub 2}. It also discusses the costs, economic potential, and societal issues of the technology, including public perception and regulatory aspects. Storage options evaluated include geological storage, ocean storage, and mineral carbonation. Notably, the report places CO{sub 2} capture and storage in the context of other climate change mitigation options, such as fuel switch, energy efficiency, renewables and nuclear energy. This report shows thatmore » the potential of CO{sub 2} capture and storage is considerable, and the costs for mitigating climate change can be decreased compared to strategies where only other climate change mitigation options are considered. The importance of future capture and storage of CO{sub 2} for mitigating climate change will depend on a number of factors, including financial incentives provided for deployment, and whether the risks of storage can be successfully managed. The volume includes a Summary for Policymakers approved by governments represented in the IPCC, and a Technical Summary. 5 annexes.« less
  • The goal of this effort was to develop a set of preliminary guidelines and recommendations for the deployment of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies in the United States. The CCS Guidelines are written for those who may be involved in decisions on a proposed project: the developers, regulators, financiers, insurers, project operators, and policymakers. Contents are: Part 1: introduction; Part 2: capture; Part 3: transport; Part 4; storage; Part. 5 supplementary information. Within these parts, eight recommended guidelines are given for: CO{sub 2} capture; ancillary environmental impacts from CO{sub 2}; pipeline design and operation; pipeline safety and integrity; sitingmore » CO{sub 2} pipelines; pipeline access and tariff regulation; guidelines for (MMV); risk assessment; financial responsibility; property rights and ownership; site selection and characterisation; injection operations; site closure; and post-closure. 18 figs., 9 tabs., 4 apps.« less