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Title: Amine Functionalized Nanoporous Materials for Carbon Dioxide Capture

Abstract

Increasing CO2 concentration level in the earth atmosphere and rising global average temperature have raised serious concerns about the effects of anthropogenic CO2 on global climate change. Meanwhile, most analyses project that fossil fuels will continue to be the dominant energy source world wide until at least the middle of the twenty first century. Significant reduction from the current level of CO2 emission due to the consumption of fossil fuels is necessary to stabilize atmospheric concentration of CO2. The focus of this chapter will be on the CO2 capture technologies related to energy production from fossil fuels, as over one third of the world’s CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel use are attributed to fossil-fuel electric power-generation plants. Solid amine sorbents have promise to overcome some of the shortcomings of liquid amines for CO2 capture in energy production. The dispersion, immobilization, and confinement of the amine functional groups into a porous solid support can result in a more stable, more mass transfer efficient, less toxic, and less corrosive material than the corresponding liquid amines. Solid amine sorbents allow a dry scrubbing process where the energy penalty associated with the evaporation of a large amount of water is avoided. Further, the amine functionalmore » groups can be tailored for lower regeneration energy requirement. The supports can be tailored independently for high stability and low mass transfer resistance. This book chapter deals with the topics of solid amine sorbents (both supported and tethered amines) as the functional materials for CO2 separation. The design rational and the performance of such materials are discussed in detail. The state of the art in the synthesis and the CO2 capture performance of solid amine sorbent is reviewed.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
918845
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-50728
12302; 3681; 6896; 6893; TRN: US200819%%473
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Environmental Applications of Nanomaterials: Synthesis, Sorbents and Sensors, 285-312
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; AMINES; CARBON DIOXIDE; CLIMATIC CHANGE; EARTH ATMOSPHERE; ENERGY SOURCES; FOSSIL FUELS; MASS TRANSFER; POWER GENERATION; CO2 capture; solide amine sorbents; carbon capture; mesoporous silica; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Zheng, Feng, Addleman, Raymond S., Aardahl, Chris L., Fryxell, Glen E., Brown, Daryl R., and Zemanian, Thomas S. Amine Functionalized Nanoporous Materials for Carbon Dioxide Capture. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Zheng, Feng, Addleman, Raymond S., Aardahl, Chris L., Fryxell, Glen E., Brown, Daryl R., & Zemanian, Thomas S. Amine Functionalized Nanoporous Materials for Carbon Dioxide Capture. United States.
Zheng, Feng, Addleman, Raymond S., Aardahl, Chris L., Fryxell, Glen E., Brown, Daryl R., and Zemanian, Thomas S. Wed . "Amine Functionalized Nanoporous Materials for Carbon Dioxide Capture". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_918845,
title = {Amine Functionalized Nanoporous Materials for Carbon Dioxide Capture},
author = {Zheng, Feng and Addleman, Raymond S. and Aardahl, Chris L. and Fryxell, Glen E. and Brown, Daryl R. and Zemanian, Thomas S.},
abstractNote = {Increasing CO2 concentration level in the earth atmosphere and rising global average temperature have raised serious concerns about the effects of anthropogenic CO2 on global climate change. Meanwhile, most analyses project that fossil fuels will continue to be the dominant energy source world wide until at least the middle of the twenty first century. Significant reduction from the current level of CO2 emission due to the consumption of fossil fuels is necessary to stabilize atmospheric concentration of CO2. The focus of this chapter will be on the CO2 capture technologies related to energy production from fossil fuels, as over one third of the world’s CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel use are attributed to fossil-fuel electric power-generation plants. Solid amine sorbents have promise to overcome some of the shortcomings of liquid amines for CO2 capture in energy production. The dispersion, immobilization, and confinement of the amine functional groups into a porous solid support can result in a more stable, more mass transfer efficient, less toxic, and less corrosive material than the corresponding liquid amines. Solid amine sorbents allow a dry scrubbing process where the energy penalty associated with the evaporation of a large amount of water is avoided. Further, the amine functional groups can be tailored for lower regeneration energy requirement. The supports can be tailored independently for high stability and low mass transfer resistance. This book chapter deals with the topics of solid amine sorbents (both supported and tethered amines) as the functional materials for CO2 separation. The design rational and the performance of such materials are discussed in detail. The state of the art in the synthesis and the CO2 capture performance of solid amine sorbent is reviewed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Apr 04 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Wed Apr 04 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Book:
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