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Title: Reductive dissolution and metal transport in lake coeur d alenesediments

Abstract

The benthic sediments in Lake Coeur d Alene, northern Idaho,have been contaminated by metals (primarily Zn, Pb, and Cu) from decadesof upstream mining activities. As part of ongoing research on thebiogeo-chemical cycling of metals in this area, a diffusivereactive-transport model has been developed to simulate metal transportin the lake sediments. The model includes 1-D inorganic diffusivetransport coupled to a biotic reaction network with multiple terminalelectron acceptors under redox disequilibrium conditions. Here, the modelis applied to evaluate the competing effects of heavy-metal mobilizationthrough biotic reductive dissolution of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, andimmobilization as biogenic sulfide minerals. Results indicate that therelative rates of Fe and sulfate reduction could play an important rolein metal transport through the envi-ronment, and that the formation of(bi)sulfide complexes could significantly enhance metal solubility, aswell as desorption from Fe hydroxides.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
COLLABORATION - University of California,Davis
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
918674
Report Number(s):
LBNL-63045
R&D Project: G4W080; TRN: US200820%%17
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Water Rock Interaction 12, Kunming, China, July31 - August 5, 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; DISSOLUTION; IDAHO; LAKES; MINING; SEDIMENTS; SOLUBILITY; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; METALS; BIOGEOCHEMISTRY; REDUCTION; BIODEGRADATION

Citation Formats

Sengor, Sevinc.S., Spycher, Nicolas.F., Ginn, Timothy.R., Moberly, James, Peyton, B., and Sani, Rajesh.K.. Reductive dissolution and metal transport in lake coeur d alenesediments. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Sengor, Sevinc.S., Spycher, Nicolas.F., Ginn, Timothy.R., Moberly, James, Peyton, B., & Sani, Rajesh.K.. Reductive dissolution and metal transport in lake coeur d alenesediments. United States.
Sengor, Sevinc.S., Spycher, Nicolas.F., Ginn, Timothy.R., Moberly, James, Peyton, B., and Sani, Rajesh.K.. Fri . "Reductive dissolution and metal transport in lake coeur d alenesediments". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/918674.
@article{osti_918674,
title = {Reductive dissolution and metal transport in lake coeur d alenesediments},
author = {Sengor, Sevinc.S. and Spycher, Nicolas.F. and Ginn, Timothy.R. and Moberly, James and Peyton, B. and Sani, Rajesh.K.},
abstractNote = {The benthic sediments in Lake Coeur d Alene, northern Idaho,have been contaminated by metals (primarily Zn, Pb, and Cu) from decadesof upstream mining activities. As part of ongoing research on thebiogeo-chemical cycling of metals in this area, a diffusivereactive-transport model has been developed to simulate metal transportin the lake sediments. The model includes 1-D inorganic diffusivetransport coupled to a biotic reaction network with multiple terminalelectron acceptors under redox disequilibrium conditions. Here, the modelis applied to evaluate the competing effects of heavy-metal mobilizationthrough biotic reductive dissolution of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, andimmobilization as biogenic sulfide minerals. Results indicate that therelative rates of Fe and sulfate reduction could play an important rolein metal transport through the envi-ronment, and that the formation of(bi)sulfide complexes could significantly enhance metal solubility, aswell as desorption from Fe hydroxides.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Apr 27 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri Apr 27 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

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