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Title: Quantum computing accelerator I/O : LDRD 52750 final report.

Abstract

In a superposition of quantum states, a bit can be in both the states '0' and '1' at the same time. This feature of the quantum bit or qubit has no parallel in classical systems. Currently, quantum computers consisting of 4 to 7 qubits in a 'quantum computing register' have been built. Innovative algorithms suited to quantum computing are now beginning to emerge, applicable to sorting and cryptanalysis, and other applications. A framework for overcoming slightly inaccurate quantum gate interactions and for causing quantum states to survive interactions with surrounding environment is emerging, called quantum error correction. Thus there is the potential for rapid advances in this field. Although quantum information processing can be applied to secure communication links (quantum cryptography) and to crack conventional cryptosystems, the first few computing applications will likely involve a 'quantum computing accelerator' similar to a 'floating point arithmetic accelerator' interfaced to a conventional Von Neumann computer architecture. This research is to develop a roadmap for applying Sandia's capabilities to the solution of some of the problems associated with maintaining quantum information, and with getting data into and out of such a 'quantum computing accelerator'. We propose to focus this work on 'quantum I/O technologies'more » by applying quantum optics on semiconductor nanostructures to leverage Sandia's expertise in semiconductor microelectronic/photonic fabrication techniques, as well as its expertise in information theory, processing, and algorithms. The work will be guided by understanding of practical requirements of computing and communication architectures. This effort will incorporate ongoing collaboration between 9000, 6000 and 1000 and between junior and senior personnel. Follow-on work to fabricate and evaluate appropriate experimental nano/microstructures will be proposed as a result of this work.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
918282
Report Number(s):
SAND2003-4688
TRN: US0805383
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACCELERATORS; ALGORITHMS; COMMUNICATIONS; COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE; CRYPTOGRAPHY; FABRICATION; INFORMATION THEORY; NANOSTRUCTURES; OPTICS; PERSONNEL; PROCESSING; QUANTUM COMPUTERS; QUANTUM INFORMATION; QUBITS; SORTING

Citation Formats

Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree, Modine, Normand Arthur, Ganti, Anand, Pierson, Lyndon George, and Tigges, Christopher P. Quantum computing accelerator I/O : LDRD 52750 final report.. United States: N. p., 2003. Web. doi:10.2172/918282.
Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree, Modine, Normand Arthur, Ganti, Anand, Pierson, Lyndon George, & Tigges, Christopher P. Quantum computing accelerator I/O : LDRD 52750 final report.. United States. doi:10.2172/918282.
Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree, Modine, Normand Arthur, Ganti, Anand, Pierson, Lyndon George, and Tigges, Christopher P. Mon . "Quantum computing accelerator I/O : LDRD 52750 final report.". United States. doi:10.2172/918282. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/918282.
@article{osti_918282,
title = {Quantum computing accelerator I/O : LDRD 52750 final report.},
author = {Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree and Modine, Normand Arthur and Ganti, Anand and Pierson, Lyndon George and Tigges, Christopher P},
abstractNote = {In a superposition of quantum states, a bit can be in both the states '0' and '1' at the same time. This feature of the quantum bit or qubit has no parallel in classical systems. Currently, quantum computers consisting of 4 to 7 qubits in a 'quantum computing register' have been built. Innovative algorithms suited to quantum computing are now beginning to emerge, applicable to sorting and cryptanalysis, and other applications. A framework for overcoming slightly inaccurate quantum gate interactions and for causing quantum states to survive interactions with surrounding environment is emerging, called quantum error correction. Thus there is the potential for rapid advances in this field. Although quantum information processing can be applied to secure communication links (quantum cryptography) and to crack conventional cryptosystems, the first few computing applications will likely involve a 'quantum computing accelerator' similar to a 'floating point arithmetic accelerator' interfaced to a conventional Von Neumann computer architecture. This research is to develop a roadmap for applying Sandia's capabilities to the solution of some of the problems associated with maintaining quantum information, and with getting data into and out of such a 'quantum computing accelerator'. We propose to focus this work on 'quantum I/O technologies' by applying quantum optics on semiconductor nanostructures to leverage Sandia's expertise in semiconductor microelectronic/photonic fabrication techniques, as well as its expertise in information theory, processing, and algorithms. The work will be guided by understanding of practical requirements of computing and communication architectures. This effort will incorporate ongoing collaboration between 9000, 6000 and 1000 and between junior and senior personnel. Follow-on work to fabricate and evaluate appropriate experimental nano/microstructures will be proposed as a result of this work.},
doi = {10.2172/918282},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2003},
month = {12}
}

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