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Title: Passive Barriers to Inadvertent Human Intrusion for Use at the Nevada Test Site

Abstract

In July1996, BN transmitted Passive Barriers to Inadvertent Human Intrusion for Use at the Nevada Test Site to the United States Department of Energy, under Contract DE-AC08-91NV10833. The 1996 paper had a limited distribution and was not reviewed for public release. In 2007, National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) made minor revisions to conform to current editorial standards of the NNSA/NSO and to meet current security requirements for public release. The primary purpose of this study was to identify types of engineered passive barriers that could deter future intrusion into buried low-level radioactive waste, particularly intrusion by drilling water wells. The study considered drilling technology, many natural and man-made materials, and both underground and above-ground barriers. Based on cost and effectiveness, the report recommended underground barriers consisting of a layer of rubble or tires. An aboveground barrier mound might also prove effective, but would cost more, and may become an attractive nuisance (e.g., might, after their purpose has been forgotten, encourage exploration for the sake of satisfying curiosity). Advances in drilling technology could render any engineered barriers ineffective if there is motivation to penetrate the barriers.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Security Technologies, LLC
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE - National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
917998
Report Number(s):
DOE/NV/25946-206
TRN: US0805202
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC52-06NA25946
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; DISTRIBUTION; DRILLING; EXPLORATION; HUMAN INTRUSION; LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; NATIONAL SECURITY; NEVADA TEST SITE; SECURITY; WATER WELLS; barriers; drilling; passive

Citation Formats

NSTec Environmental Management. Passive Barriers to Inadvertent Human Intrusion for Use at the Nevada Test Site. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/917998.
NSTec Environmental Management. Passive Barriers to Inadvertent Human Intrusion for Use at the Nevada Test Site. United States. doi:10.2172/917998.
NSTec Environmental Management. Fri . "Passive Barriers to Inadvertent Human Intrusion for Use at the Nevada Test Site". United States. doi:10.2172/917998. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/917998.
@article{osti_917998,
title = {Passive Barriers to Inadvertent Human Intrusion for Use at the Nevada Test Site},
author = {NSTec Environmental Management},
abstractNote = {In July1996, BN transmitted Passive Barriers to Inadvertent Human Intrusion for Use at the Nevada Test Site to the United States Department of Energy, under Contract DE-AC08-91NV10833. The 1996 paper had a limited distribution and was not reviewed for public release. In 2007, National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) made minor revisions to conform to current editorial standards of the NNSA/NSO and to meet current security requirements for public release. The primary purpose of this study was to identify types of engineered passive barriers that could deter future intrusion into buried low-level radioactive waste, particularly intrusion by drilling water wells. The study considered drilling technology, many natural and man-made materials, and both underground and above-ground barriers. Based on cost and effectiveness, the report recommended underground barriers consisting of a layer of rubble or tires. An aboveground barrier mound might also prove effective, but would cost more, and may become an attractive nuisance (e.g., might, after their purpose has been forgotten, encourage exploration for the sake of satisfying curiosity). Advances in drilling technology could render any engineered barriers ineffective if there is motivation to penetrate the barriers.},
doi = {10.2172/917998},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

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