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Title: Measuring and Managing Cleanroom Energy Use

Abstract

Combining high air-recirculation rates and energy-intensive processes, cleanrooms are 20 to 100 times as costly to operate on a per-square-foot basis as conventional commercial buildings. Additionally, they operate 24 hr a day, seven days a week, which means their electricity demand always is contributing to peak utility-system demand, an important fact given increasing reliance on time-dependent tariffs.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; California Energy Commission
OSTI Identifier:
917796
Report Number(s):
LBNL/PUB-946
Journal ID: ISSN 0017-940X; HPAOAM; R&D Project: E12015; BnR: 600305000; TRN: US200817%%869
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Heating/Piping/Air Conditioning Engineering; Journal Volume: 0; Journal Issue: 0; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: Dec. 2005
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32; 29; 42; CLEAN ROOMS; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; MANAGEMENT; Cleanrooms energy efficiency

Citation Formats

Tschudi, William, Mills, Evan, Xu, Tenfang, and Rumsey, Peter. Measuring and Managing Cleanroom Energy Use. United States: N. p., 2005. Web.
Tschudi, William, Mills, Evan, Xu, Tenfang, & Rumsey, Peter. Measuring and Managing Cleanroom Energy Use. United States.
Tschudi, William, Mills, Evan, Xu, Tenfang, and Rumsey, Peter. Tue . "Measuring and Managing Cleanroom Energy Use". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_917796,
title = {Measuring and Managing Cleanroom Energy Use},
author = {Tschudi, William and Mills, Evan and Xu, Tenfang and Rumsey, Peter},
abstractNote = {Combining high air-recirculation rates and energy-intensive processes, cleanrooms are 20 to 100 times as costly to operate on a per-square-foot basis as conventional commercial buildings. Additionally, they operate 24 hr a day, seven days a week, which means their electricity demand always is contributing to peak utility-system demand, an important fact given increasing reliance on time-dependent tariffs.},
doi = {},
journal = {Heating/Piping/Air Conditioning Engineering},
number = 0,
volume = 0,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 15 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 15 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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