skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Towards Resolving Conflicting Reports of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Populations Exposed to Ionizing Radiation: Implications for the Hibakusha

Abstract

Radiation induced genomic instability has been described in a host of normal and transformed cells in vitro (Morgan 2003a). This instability can manifest as cell killing, micronuclei formation, transformation induction, di- and tri- nucleotide repeat instability, gene amplifications and mutations, and chromosomal rearrangements. Cytogenetic alterations are perhaps the best described of these endpoints following radiation exposures and will be the focus of this chapter. Chromosomal instability is characterized as either multiple sub populations of chromosomally rearranged metaphase chromosomes, or as newly arising chromatid and/or chromosomal aberrations occurring in the clonally expanded decedents of an irradiated cell. Some chromosomal changes appear to entail recombination events involving DNA repeat sequences within the genome, e.g., interstitial telomere-repeat like sequences (Day et al. 1998) and may be manifestations of telomere dysfunction in unstable clones of cells (Murnane and Sabatier 2004). Others, including the appearance of chromatid aberrations, indicate that DNA lesions can manifest in the preceding cell cycle multiple cell generations after the initial insult.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
917582
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-52517
3482; TRN: US200817%%766
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Radiation Risk Perspectives: Proceedings of the Second Nagasaki Symposium of International Consortium for Medical Care of Hibakusha and Radiation Life Science, Nagasaki, Japan, 26–27 July 2006. Published in International Congress Series, 1299:128-134
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; CELL CYCLE; CELL KILLING; CHROMOSOMAL ABERRATIONS; GENE AMPLIFICATION; IN VITRO; INSTABILITY; IONIZING RADIATIONS; NAGASAKI; RADIATIONS; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Morgan, William F., and Sowa, Marianne B. Towards Resolving Conflicting Reports of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Populations Exposed to Ionizing Radiation: Implications for the Hibakusha. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ics.2006.10.003.
Morgan, William F., & Sowa, Marianne B. Towards Resolving Conflicting Reports of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Populations Exposed to Ionizing Radiation: Implications for the Hibakusha. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ics.2006.10.003.
Morgan, William F., and Sowa, Marianne B. Fri . "Towards Resolving Conflicting Reports of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Populations Exposed to Ionizing Radiation: Implications for the Hibakusha". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ics.2006.10.003.
@article{osti_917582,
title = {Towards Resolving Conflicting Reports of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Populations Exposed to Ionizing Radiation: Implications for the Hibakusha},
author = {Morgan, William F. and Sowa, Marianne B.},
abstractNote = {Radiation induced genomic instability has been described in a host of normal and transformed cells in vitro (Morgan 2003a). This instability can manifest as cell killing, micronuclei formation, transformation induction, di- and tri- nucleotide repeat instability, gene amplifications and mutations, and chromosomal rearrangements. Cytogenetic alterations are perhaps the best described of these endpoints following radiation exposures and will be the focus of this chapter. Chromosomal instability is characterized as either multiple sub populations of chromosomally rearranged metaphase chromosomes, or as newly arising chromatid and/or chromosomal aberrations occurring in the clonally expanded decedents of an irradiated cell. Some chromosomal changes appear to entail recombination events involving DNA repeat sequences within the genome, e.g., interstitial telomere-repeat like sequences (Day et al. 1998) and may be manifestations of telomere dysfunction in unstable clones of cells (Murnane and Sabatier 2004). Others, including the appearance of chromatid aberrations, indicate that DNA lesions can manifest in the preceding cell cycle multiple cell generations after the initial insult.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ics.2006.10.003},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri Mar 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share: