skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: The 4th Generation Light Source at Jefferson Lab

Abstract

A number of "Grand Challenges" in Science have recently been identified in reports from The National Academy of Sciences, and the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences. Many of these require a new generation of linac-based light source to study dynamical and non-linear phenomena in nanoscale samples. In this paper we present a summary of the properties of such light sources, comparing them with existing sources, and then describing in more detail a specific source at Jefferson Lab. Importantly, the JLab light source has developed some novel technology which is a critical enabler for other new light sources.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; more »; ; ; ; ; ; « less
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE - Office of Energy Research (ER)
OSTI Identifier:
917546
Report Number(s):
JLAB-ACT-07-661; DOE/OR/23177-0165
TRN: US0805019
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-06OR23177
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: SRI 2007, Baton Rouge, La, April 25-27, 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; LIGHT SOURCES; CEBAF ACCELERATOR; DESIGN

Citation Formats

Stephen Benson, George Biallas, James Boyce, Donald Bullard, James Coleman, David Douglas, H. Dylla, Richard Evans, Pavel Evtushenko, Albert Grippo, Christopher Gould, Joseph Gubeli, David Hardy, Carlos Hernandez-Garcia, Kevin Jordan, John Klopf, Steven Moore, George Neil, Thomas Powers, Joseph Preble, Daniel Sexton, Michelle D. Shinn, Christopher Tennant, Richard Walker, Shukui Zhang, and Gwyn Williams. The 4th Generation Light Source at Jefferson Lab. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Stephen Benson, George Biallas, James Boyce, Donald Bullard, James Coleman, David Douglas, H. Dylla, Richard Evans, Pavel Evtushenko, Albert Grippo, Christopher Gould, Joseph Gubeli, David Hardy, Carlos Hernandez-Garcia, Kevin Jordan, John Klopf, Steven Moore, George Neil, Thomas Powers, Joseph Preble, Daniel Sexton, Michelle D. Shinn, Christopher Tennant, Richard Walker, Shukui Zhang, & Gwyn Williams. The 4th Generation Light Source at Jefferson Lab. United States.
Stephen Benson, George Biallas, James Boyce, Donald Bullard, James Coleman, David Douglas, H. Dylla, Richard Evans, Pavel Evtushenko, Albert Grippo, Christopher Gould, Joseph Gubeli, David Hardy, Carlos Hernandez-Garcia, Kevin Jordan, John Klopf, Steven Moore, George Neil, Thomas Powers, Joseph Preble, Daniel Sexton, Michelle D. Shinn, Christopher Tennant, Richard Walker, Shukui Zhang, and Gwyn Williams. Wed . "The 4th Generation Light Source at Jefferson Lab". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/917546.
@article{osti_917546,
title = {The 4th Generation Light Source at Jefferson Lab},
author = {Stephen Benson and George Biallas and James Boyce and Donald Bullard and James Coleman and David Douglas and H. Dylla and Richard Evans and Pavel Evtushenko and Albert Grippo and Christopher Gould and Joseph Gubeli and David Hardy and Carlos Hernandez-Garcia and Kevin Jordan and John Klopf and Steven Moore and George Neil and Thomas Powers and Joseph Preble and Daniel Sexton and Michelle D. Shinn and Christopher Tennant and Richard Walker and Shukui Zhang and Gwyn Williams},
abstractNote = {A number of "Grand Challenges" in Science have recently been identified in reports from The National Academy of Sciences, and the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences. Many of these require a new generation of linac-based light source to study dynamical and non-linear phenomena in nanoscale samples. In this paper we present a summary of the properties of such light sources, comparing them with existing sources, and then describing in more detail a specific source at Jefferson Lab. Importantly, the JLab light source has developed some novel technology which is a critical enabler for other new light sources.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Apr 25 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Wed Apr 25 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • Jefferson Lab is in the process of building an upgrade to our Free-Electron Laser Facility with broad wavelength range and timing flexibility. The facility will have two cw free-electron lasers, one in the infrared operating from 1 to 14 microns and one in the infrared operating from 0.25 to 1 micron [1]. In addition, there will be beamlines for Thompson-backscattered femtosecond X-rays, and broadband THz radiation. The average power levels for each of these devices will exceed any other available sources by at least 2 orders of magnitude. Timing of the available laser pulses can be continuously mode-locked at leastmore » 4 different (MHz) repetition rates or in macropulse mode with pulses of a few microseconds in duration with a repetition rate of many kHz. The status of the construction of this facility and a review of its capabilities will be presented.« less
  • Jefferson Lab has designed, built and operated two high average power free-electron lasers (FEL) using superconducting RF (SRF) technology and energy recovery techniques. Between 1999-2001 Jefferson Lab operated the IR Demo FEL. This device produced over 2 kW in the mid-infrared, in addition to producing world record average powers in the visible (50 W), ultraviolet (10 W) and terahertz range (50 W) for tunable, short-pulse (< ps) light. This FEL was the first high power demonstration of an accelerator configuration that is being exploited for a number of new accelerator-driven light source facilities that are currently under design or construction.more » The driver accelerator for the IR Demo FEL uses an Energy Recovered Linac (ERL) configuration that improves the energy efficiency and lowers both the capital and operating cost of such devices by recovering most of the power in the spent electron beam after optical power is extracted from the beam. The IR Demo FEL was de-commissioned in late 2001 for an upgraded FEL for extending the IR power to over 10 kW and the ultraviolet power to over 1 kW. The FEL Upgrade achieved 10 kW of average power in the mid-IR (6 microns) in July of 2004, and its IR operation currently is being extended down to 1 micron. In addition, we have demonstrated the capability of on/off cycling and recovering over a megawatt of electron beam power without diminishing machine performance. A complementary UV FEL will come on-line within the next year. This paper presents a summary of the FEL characteristics, user community accomplishments with the IR Demo, and planned user experiments.« less
  • We describe a dual free-electron laser (FEL) configuration on the UV Demo FEL at Jefferson Lab that allows simultaneous lasing at FIR/THz and UV wavelengths. The FIR/THz source would be an FEL oscillator with a short wiggler providing nearly diffraction-limited pulses with pulse energy exceeding 50 microJoules. The FIR source would use the exhaust beam from a UVFEL. The coherent harmonics in the VUV from the UVFEL are out-coupled through a hole. The FIR source uses a shorter resonator with either hole or edge coupling to provide very high power FIR pulses. Simulations indicate excel-lent spectral brightness in the FIRmore » region with over 100 W/cm-1 output.« less
  • This slide show presents an introduction to Free-Electron Lasers (FELs) and what makes the JLab FELs unique. Ways of exploring the nature of matter with the FEL are shown, including applications in the THz, IR, UV, and VUV. The Jefferson Lab FEL Facility is unique in its high average brightness in the THz, and IR -- VUV spectral regions and Sub ps-pulses at MHz repetition rates. With an installation of a rebuilt 'F100' cryomodule the linac energy will increase to > 150MeV. This will permit lasing further into the UV and extend VUV. With the swap of our CEBAF-style cryounitmore » for an improved booster, we could lase in the VUV. Addition of a wiggler and optical cavity slightly canted from the UV beamline would allow simultaneous lasing of UV and THz for high E-field 2 color experiments.« less
  • This working group on 4th Generation Light Source (4GLS) Instrumentation was a follow-up to the opening-discussion on Challenges in Beam Profiling. It was in parallel with the Feedback Systems session. We filled the SSRL Conference Room with about 25 participants. The session opened with an introduction by Lumpkin. The target beam parameter values for a few-angstrom, self-amplified spontaneous emissions (SASE) experiment and for a diffraction-limited soft x-ray storage ring source were addressed. Instrument resolution would of course need to be 2-3 times better than the value measured, if possible. The nominal targeted performance parameters are emittance (1-2{pi} mm mrad), bunchmore » length (100 fs), peak-current (l-5 kA), beam size (10 {micro}m), beam divergence (1 {micro}rad), energy spread (2 x 10{sup {minus}4}), and beam energy (10's of GeV). These are mostly the SASE values, and the possible parameters for a diffraction-limited soft x-ray source would be relaxed somewhat. Beam stability and alignment specifications in the sub-micron domain for either device are anticipated.« less