skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Revisiting cosmological bounds on radiative neutrino lifetime

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
917440
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-PUB-07-135-A
arXiv eprint number arXiv:0705.4667
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Phys.Rev.D76:053007,2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; Phenomenology-HEP

Citation Formats

Mirizzi, Alessandro, /Munich, Max Planck Inst., Montanino, Daniele, /Lecce U. /INFN, Lecce, Serpico, Pasquale D., and /Fermilab. Revisiting cosmological bounds on radiative neutrino lifetime. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.76.053007.
Mirizzi, Alessandro, /Munich, Max Planck Inst., Montanino, Daniele, /Lecce U. /INFN, Lecce, Serpico, Pasquale D., & /Fermilab. Revisiting cosmological bounds on radiative neutrino lifetime. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.76.053007.
Mirizzi, Alessandro, /Munich, Max Planck Inst., Montanino, Daniele, /Lecce U. /INFN, Lecce, Serpico, Pasquale D., and /Fermilab. Tue . "Revisiting cosmological bounds on radiative neutrino lifetime". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.76.053007. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/917440.
@article{osti_917440,
title = {Revisiting cosmological bounds on radiative neutrino lifetime},
author = {Mirizzi, Alessandro and /Munich, Max Planck Inst. and Montanino, Daniele and /Lecce U. /INFN, Lecce and Serpico, Pasquale D. and /Fermilab},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevD.76.053007},
journal = {Phys.Rev.D76:053007,2007},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • Neutrino oscillation experiments and direct bounds on absolute masses constrain neutrino mass differences to fall into the microwave energy range, for most of the allowed parameter space. As a consequence of these recent phenomenological advances, older constraints on radiative neutrino decays based on diffuse background radiations and assuming strongly hierarchical masses in the eV range are now outdated. We thus derive new bounds on the radiative neutrino lifetime using the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer instrument on board the Cosmic Background Explorer. The lower bound on the lifetime is between amore » fewx10{sup 19} s and {approx}5x10{sup 20} s, depending on the neutrino mass ordering and on the absolute mass scale. However, due to phase space limitations, the upper bound in terms of the effective magnetic moment mediating the decay is not better than {approx}10{sup -8} Bohr magnetons. We also comment about possible improvements of these limits, by means of recent diffuse infrared photon background data. We compare these bounds with preexisting limits coming from laboratory or astrophysical arguments. We emphasize the complementarity of our results with others available in the literature.« less
  • We employ state-of-the art cosmological observables including supernova surveys and BAO information to provide constraints on the mass and mixing angle of a non-resonantly produced sterile neutrino species, showing that cosmology can effectively rule out sterile neutrinos which decay between BBN and the present day. The decoupling of an additional heavy neutrino species can modify the time dependence of the Universe's expansion between BBN and recombination and, in extreme cases, lead to an additional matter-dominated period; while this could naively lead to a younger Universe with a larger Hubble parameter, it could later be compensated by the extra radiation expectedmore » in the form of neutrinos from sterile decay. However, recombination-era observables including the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), the shift parameter R{sub CMB} and the sound horizon r{sub s} from Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) severely constrain this scenario. We self-consistently include the full time-evolution of the coupled sterile neutrino and standard model sectors in an MCMC, showing that if decay occurs after BBN, the sterile neutrino is essentially bounded by the constraint sin{sup 2}θ ∼< 0.026 (m{sub s}/eV){sup −2}.« less
  • Future cosmological data may be sensitive to the effects of a finite sum of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a cosmological detection of neutrino mass at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence on neutrino secret interactions with (quasi-)massless particles as in majoron models. On the other hand, neutrino decay may provide a way-out to explain a discrepancy {approx}< 0.1 eV between cosmic neutrino bounds and Lab data.
  • Future cosmological data may be sensitive to the effects of a finite sum of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a cosmological detection of neutrino mass at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence, on neutrino secret interactions with (quasi)massless particles as in Majoron models. On the other hand, neutrino decay may provide a way out to explain a discrepancy < or approx. 0.1 eV between cosmic neutrino bounds and lab data.
  • We investigate the cosmological effects of a neutrino interaction with cold dark-matter. We postulate a neutrino that interacts with a ''neutrino-interacting dark-matter'' (NIDM) particle with an elastic-scattering cross section that either decreases with temperature as T{sup 2} or remains constant with temperature. The neutrino-dark-matter interaction results in a neutrino-dark-matter fluid with pressure, and this pressure results in diffusion-damped oscillations in the matter power spectrum, analogous to the acoustic oscillations in the baryon-photon fluid. We discuss the bounds from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey on the NIDM opacity (ratio of cross section to NIDM-particle mass) and compare with the constraint frommore » observation of neutrinos from supernova 1987A. If only a fraction of the dark matter interacts with neutrinos, then NIDM oscillations may affect current cosmological constraints from measurements of galaxy clustering. We discuss how detection of NIDM oscillations would suggest a particle-antiparticle asymmetry in the dark-matter sector.« less