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Title: Experimental and Computational Evaluation of the H2 Transport Properties of Relevant Membrane Metals and Corrosion Scales

Abstract

The United States Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory is aggressively investigating technologies to address global climate change, secure fuel independence and ultimately move towards clean power generation. Fossil energy sources (such as coal) coupled with gasification processes are a means of addressing the near-term impact of the aforementioned concerns. Coal gasification with integrated hydrogen membrane technologies has the potential of increasing process efficiency and reducing capital costs, as well as producing a high purity hydrogen stream which can be used as an energy carrier and a high-pressure CO2-enriched stream for ultimate sequestration. Thus, a viable membrane candidate for integration into the gasification process must possess characteristics such as the ability to operate at elevated temperatures, at elevated trans-membrane pressure differentials, and in the presence of major and minor syngas constituents. A major obstacle in the development of membrane technologies is the identification of potential membrane materials and catalysts that can tolerate or even exhibit advantageous characteristics in the harsh environments associated with gasification. To address these obstacles, NETL has vigorously pursued collaborative experimental and computational efforts to evaluate the interaction of major (CO, CO2, H2O) and minor (H2S) gasification constituents with prospective membrane materials. In this study, themore » interaction of H2S with Pd and select Pd-Cu alloys is being evaluated both computationally and experimentally with the goal of correlating changes in membrane performance with temperature, alloy structure, corrosion behavior and surface chemistry. The results obtained through experimental studies on H2 permeability in the absence and presence of H2S, sulfide scale growth kinetics and permeability will be presented and complimented by DFT atomistic modeling of the diffusion properties of the bulk and corrosion scale.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];
  1. (Carnegie Mellon Univ.)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, and Morgantown, WV
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE - Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
916958
Report Number(s):
DOE/NETL-IR-2007-214
TRN: US200816%%205
DOE Contract Number:
None cited
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: North American Membrane Society Annual Meeting, Orlando, FL, May 14-17,2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; CAPITALIZED COST; CLIMATIC CHANGE; COAL GASIFICATION; CORROSION; ENERGY SOURCES; EVALUATION; GASIFICATION; MEMBRANES; POWER GENERATION; TRANSPORT

Citation Formats

Morreale, B.D., Howard, B.H., Enick, R.M., Ling, C., and Sholl, D.S.. Experimental and Computational Evaluation of the H2 Transport Properties of Relevant Membrane Metals and Corrosion Scales. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Morreale, B.D., Howard, B.H., Enick, R.M., Ling, C., & Sholl, D.S.. Experimental and Computational Evaluation of the H2 Transport Properties of Relevant Membrane Metals and Corrosion Scales. United States.
Morreale, B.D., Howard, B.H., Enick, R.M., Ling, C., and Sholl, D.S.. Tue . "Experimental and Computational Evaluation of the H2 Transport Properties of Relevant Membrane Metals and Corrosion Scales". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_916958,
title = {Experimental and Computational Evaluation of the H2 Transport Properties of Relevant Membrane Metals and Corrosion Scales},
author = {Morreale, B.D. and Howard, B.H. and Enick, R.M. and Ling, C. and Sholl, D.S.},
abstractNote = {The United States Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory is aggressively investigating technologies to address global climate change, secure fuel independence and ultimately move towards clean power generation. Fossil energy sources (such as coal) coupled with gasification processes are a means of addressing the near-term impact of the aforementioned concerns. Coal gasification with integrated hydrogen membrane technologies has the potential of increasing process efficiency and reducing capital costs, as well as producing a high purity hydrogen stream which can be used as an energy carrier and a high-pressure CO2-enriched stream for ultimate sequestration. Thus, a viable membrane candidate for integration into the gasification process must possess characteristics such as the ability to operate at elevated temperatures, at elevated trans-membrane pressure differentials, and in the presence of major and minor syngas constituents. A major obstacle in the development of membrane technologies is the identification of potential membrane materials and catalysts that can tolerate or even exhibit advantageous characteristics in the harsh environments associated with gasification. To address these obstacles, NETL has vigorously pursued collaborative experimental and computational efforts to evaluate the interaction of major (CO, CO2, H2O) and minor (H2S) gasification constituents with prospective membrane materials. In this study, the interaction of H2S with Pd and select Pd-Cu alloys is being evaluated both computationally and experimentally with the goal of correlating changes in membrane performance with temperature, alloy structure, corrosion behavior and surface chemistry. The results obtained through experimental studies on H2 permeability in the absence and presence of H2S, sulfide scale growth kinetics and permeability will be presented and complimented by DFT atomistic modeling of the diffusion properties of the bulk and corrosion scale.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

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