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Title: Task- and Time-Dependent Weighting Factors in a Retrospective Exposure Assessment of Chemical Laboratory Workers

Abstract

Results are reported from a chemical exposure assessment that was conducted for a cohort mortality study of 6157 chemical laboratory workers employed between 1943 and 1998 at four Department of Energy sites in Oak Ridge, Tenn., and Aiken, S.C.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
915750
Report Number(s):
07-OEWH-1072
Journal ID: 1545-9624 print; TRN: US0804366
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-06OR23100
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene; Journal Volume: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; LABORATORIES; MORTALITY; PERSONNEL; OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY; OAK RIDGE RESERVATION; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; exposure assessment, laboratory workers, nuclear facilities, weighting factors

Citation Formats

Scott A. Henn, David F. Utterback, Kathleen M. Waters, Andrea M. Markey, William G. Tankersley. Task- and Time-Dependent Weighting Factors in a Retrospective Exposure Assessment of Chemical Laboratory Workers. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1080/15459620601109407.
Scott A. Henn, David F. Utterback, Kathleen M. Waters, Andrea M. Markey, William G. Tankersley. Task- and Time-Dependent Weighting Factors in a Retrospective Exposure Assessment of Chemical Laboratory Workers. United States. doi:10.1080/15459620601109407.
Scott A. Henn, David F. Utterback, Kathleen M. Waters, Andrea M. Markey, William G. Tankersley. Thu . "Task- and Time-Dependent Weighting Factors in a Retrospective Exposure Assessment of Chemical Laboratory Workers". United States. doi:10.1080/15459620601109407.
@article{osti_915750,
title = {Task- and Time-Dependent Weighting Factors in a Retrospective Exposure Assessment of Chemical Laboratory Workers},
author = {Scott A. Henn, David F. Utterback, Kathleen M. Waters, Andrea M. Markey, William G. Tankersley},
abstractNote = {Results are reported from a chemical exposure assessment that was conducted for a cohort mortality study of 6157 chemical laboratory workers employed between 1943 and 1998 at four Department of Energy sites in Oak Ridge, Tenn., and Aiken, S.C.},
doi = {10.1080/15459620601109407},
journal = {Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene},
number = ,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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