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Title: Graph Theory

Abstract

Graph theory is a branch of discrete combinatorial mathematics that studies the properties of graphs. The theory was pioneered by the Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler in the 18th century, commenced its formal development during the second half of the 19th century, and has witnessed substantial growth during the last seventy years, with applications in areas as diverse as engineering, computer science, physics, sociology, chemistry and biology. Graph theory has also had a strong impact in computational linguistics by providing the foundations for the theory of features structures that has emerged as one of the most widely used frameworks for the representation of grammar formalisms.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
915722
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-45069
TRN: US200816%%39
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics, 2nd Edition, 140-142
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; GRAPH THEORY; DIAGRAMS; USES; Graph; graph theory; vertice; node; arc; edge; hypergraphs; rooted graph; connected graph; directed acyclic graph (DAG); feature structure; attribute-value matrix; subsumption; unification; monotonic; default inheritance; multiple inheritance; Computational Linguistics; Mathematical Linguistics; Knowledge Representation; Artificial Intelligence; Social Network Analysis

Citation Formats

Sanfilippo, Antonio P. Graph Theory. United States: N. p., 2005. Web.
Sanfilippo, Antonio P. Graph Theory. United States.
Sanfilippo, Antonio P. Tue . "Graph Theory". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_915722,
title = {Graph Theory},
author = {Sanfilippo, Antonio P.},
abstractNote = {Graph theory is a branch of discrete combinatorial mathematics that studies the properties of graphs. The theory was pioneered by the Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler in the 18th century, commenced its formal development during the second half of the 19th century, and has witnessed substantial growth during the last seventy years, with applications in areas as diverse as engineering, computer science, physics, sociology, chemistry and biology. Graph theory has also had a strong impact in computational linguistics by providing the foundations for the theory of features structures that has emerged as one of the most widely used frameworks for the representation of grammar formalisms.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Dec 27 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Dec 27 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}

Book:
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