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Title: Bismuth Surfactant Effects for GaAsN and Beryllium Doping of GaAsN and GaInAsN Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
915662
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Crystal Growth; Journal Volume: 304; Journal Issue: 2, 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; BERYLLIUM; BISMUTH; MOLECULAR BEAM EPITAXY; SURFACTANTS; Solar Energy - Photovoltaics

Citation Formats

Liu, T., Chandril, S., Ptak, A. J., Korakakis, D., and Myers, T. H.. Bismuth Surfactant Effects for GaAsN and Beryllium Doping of GaAsN and GaInAsN Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jcrysgro.2007.04.013.
Liu, T., Chandril, S., Ptak, A. J., Korakakis, D., & Myers, T. H.. Bismuth Surfactant Effects for GaAsN and Beryllium Doping of GaAsN and GaInAsN Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jcrysgro.2007.04.013.
Liu, T., Chandril, S., Ptak, A. J., Korakakis, D., and Myers, T. H.. Mon . "Bismuth Surfactant Effects for GaAsN and Beryllium Doping of GaAsN and GaInAsN Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jcrysgro.2007.04.013.
@article{osti_915662,
title = {Bismuth Surfactant Effects for GaAsN and Beryllium Doping of GaAsN and GaInAsN Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy},
author = {Liu, T. and Chandril, S. and Ptak, A. J. and Korakakis, D. and Myers, T. H.},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {10.1016/j.jcrysgro.2007.04.013},
journal = {Journal of Crystal Growth},
number = 2, 2007,
volume = 304,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Boron is potentially useful for strain balancing compressively strained materials such as InGaAs and GaAsBi that are being developed for use in optical and electronic devices. Understanding and improving the incorporation of boron in GaAs is an important first step toward the realization of these strain-balanced systems. Here, we show that the apparent boron incorporation in GaAs, determined from X-ray diffraction measurements, decreases as the substrate temperature is increased, although measurements of the metallurgical concentration of boron remain constant. This implies that boron is incorporating preferentially on non-substitutional sites as growth temperature is increased. The addition of a bismuth surfactantmore » flux not only makes the epilayers smoother, but within a narrow range of substrate temperatures, restores the incorporation of substitutional boron.« less
  • We present the results of GaInNAs/GaAs quantum dot structures with GaAsN barrier layers grown by solid source molecular beam epitaxy. Extension of the emission wavelength of GaInNAs quantum dots by {approx}170 nm was observed in samples with GaAsN barriers in place of GaAs. However, optimization of the GaAsN barrier layer thickness is necessary to avoid degradation in luminescence intensity and structural property of the GaInNAs dots. Lasers with GaInNAs quantum dots as active layer were fabricated and room-temperature continuous-wave lasing was observed. Lasing occurs via the ground state at {approx}1.2 {mu}m, with threshold current density of 2.1 kA/cm{sup 2} andmore » maximum output power of 16 mW.« less
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  • Ge/Si heterostructures were grown on Si (001) by Sn-submonolayer-mediated molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and characterized by a variety of techniques, in order to study the behavior of Sn surfactant during Ge and Si growth and its influence on Ge/Si interface quality. It was found that Sn strongly segregates to the growing surface of both Ge and Si and that the presence of Sn surfactant can effectively suppress Ge segregation into a Si overlayer and enhance the surface mobility of adatoms. These results suggest that Sn-mediated epitaxy can be used as a viable method to produce Ge/Si superlattices, with an interfacemore » quality superior to those grown either by conventional MBE or with other types of surfactants. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Vacuum} {ital Society}« less
  • Plastically relaxed GeSi films with the Ge fraction equal to 0.29-0.42 and thickness as large as 0.5 {mu}m were grown on Si (001) substrates using the low-temperature (350 deg. C) buffer Si layer and Sb as a surfactant. It is shown that introduction of Sb that smoothens the film surface at the stage of pseudomorphic growth lowers the density of threading dislocations in the plastically relaxed heterostructure by 1-1.5 orders of magnitude and also reduces the final roughness of the surface. The root-mean-square value of roughness smaller than 1 nm was obtained for a film with the Ge content ofmore » 0.29 and the density of threading dislocations of about 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}. It is assumed that the effect of surfactant is based on the fact that the activity of surface sources of dislocations is reduced in the presence of Sb.« less