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Title: Effects of Temperature, Nitrogen Ions, and Antimony on Wide Depletion Width GaInNAs

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
915658
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Vacuum, Science and Technology. B, Microelectronics and Nanometer Structures; Journal Volume: 25; Journal Issue: 3, May/June 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ANTIMONY; NITROGEN IONS; GALLIUM COMPOUNDS; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; Solar Energy - Photovoltaics

Citation Formats

Ptak, A. J., Friedman, D. J., and Kurtz, S. Effects of Temperature, Nitrogen Ions, and Antimony on Wide Depletion Width GaInNAs. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1116/1.2715993.
Ptak, A. J., Friedman, D. J., & Kurtz, S. Effects of Temperature, Nitrogen Ions, and Antimony on Wide Depletion Width GaInNAs. United States. doi:10.1116/1.2715993.
Ptak, A. J., Friedman, D. J., and Kurtz, S. Tue . "Effects of Temperature, Nitrogen Ions, and Antimony on Wide Depletion Width GaInNAs". United States. doi:10.1116/1.2715993.
@article{osti_915658,
title = {Effects of Temperature, Nitrogen Ions, and Antimony on Wide Depletion Width GaInNAs},
author = {Ptak, A. J. and Friedman, D. J. and Kurtz, S.},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {10.1116/1.2715993},
journal = {Journal of Vacuum, Science and Technology. B, Microelectronics and Nanometer Structures},
number = 3, May/June 2007,
volume = 25,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • GaInNAs solar cells could be useful in next-generation multijunction solar cells if issues surrounding low photocurrents and photovoltages are surmounted. Wide-depletion-width devices generate significant photocurrent using a p-i-n structure grown by molecular beam epitaxy, but these depletion widths are only realized in a region of parameter space that leads to rough surface morphologies. Here, bismuth is explored as a surfactant for the growth of GaInNAs solar cells. Very low fluxes of Bi are effective at maintaining smooth surfaces, even at high growth temperatures and In contents. However, Bi also increases the net donor concentration in these materials, manifested in ourmore » n-on-p device structures as a pn-junction that moves deeper into the base layer with increasing Bi fluxes. Quantum efficiency modeling and scanning kelvin probe microscopy measurements confirm the type conversion of the base layer from p type to n type. Bi incorporation in GaAsBi samples shows signs of surface segregation, leading to a finite buildup time, and this effect may lead to slow changes in the electrical properties of the GaInNAs(Bi) devices. Bi also appears to create a defect level, although this defect level is not deleterious enough to increase the dark current in the devices.« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • We have studied the effects of growth temperature and subsequent thermal annealing on nitrogen incorporation into lattice-matched dilute Ga{sub 0.942}In{sub 0.058}NAs-on-GaAs epilayers, which were grown by the molecular-beam epitaxy method. The samples were studied experimentally by means of x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy and theoretically by calculations within the density-functional theory. Over the entire range of growth temperatures applied (410-470 deg. C), nitrogen appeared to be mainly located on substitutional sites in 'short-range-order clusters' as N-Ga{sub 4} and, to a lesser extent, as N-Ga{sub 3}In. There were also indications of the presence of nitrogen dimers NN, as suggested by Ramanmore » spectroscopy, in qualitative agreement with the calculations. An increase in growth temperature reduced the amount of substitutional nitrogen and decreased the number of N-Ga{sub 4} clusters relative to N-Ga{sub 3}In. Postgrowth thermal annealing promoted the formation of In-N bonds and caused a blueshift in the optical band gap, which increased as the growth temperature was lowered.« less
  • GaInNAs has an important impact on developing GaAs-based optoelectronics and multijunction solar cells, but the complex nature of the nitrogen incorporation into GaInAs is still not fully understood. By combining x-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, and photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, we show that nitrogen incorporation is enhanced with increasing growth temperature in the range of 300-450 Degree-Sign C. We study the growth front and show that the surface reconstruction is (1 Multiplication-Sign 3) regardless of growth temperature in this range. The enhanced nitrogen incorporation can be modeled as a thermally activated process with activation energy of about 0.1 eV.
  • Gain properties of GaInNAs lasers with different nitrogen concentrations in the quantum wells are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Whereas nitrogen incorporation induces appreciable modifications in the spectral extension and the carrier density dependence of the gain, it is found that the linewidth enhancement factor is reduced by inclusion of nitrogen, but basically unaffected by different nitrogen content due to the balancing between gain and index changes.