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Title: Analysis of Biomass Sugars Using a Novel HPLC Method

Abstract

The precise quantitative analysis of biomass sugars is a very important step in the conversion of biomass feedstocks to fuels and chemicals. However, the most accurate method of biomass sugar analysis is based on the gas chromatography analysis of derivatized sugars either as alditol acetates or trimethylsilanes. The derivatization method is time consuming but the alternative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method cannot resolve most sugars found in biomass hydrolysates. We have demonstrated for the first time that by careful manipulation of the HPLC mobile phase, biomass monomeric sugars (arabinose, xylose, fructose, glucose, mannose, and galactose) can be analyzed quantitatively and there is excellent baseline resolution of all the sugars. This method was demonstrated for standard sugars, pretreated corn stover liquid and solid fractions. Our method can also be used to analyze dimeric sugars (cellobiose and sucrose).

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
915654
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology; Journal Volume: 136; Journal Issue: 3, 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ACETATES; AGRICULTURAL WASTES; ARABINOSE; BIOMASS; CELLOBIOSE; DERIVATIZATION; FRUCTOSE; GALACTOSE; GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY; GLUCOSE; HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY; MAIZE; MANNOSE; XYLOSE; Alternative Fuels

Citation Formats

Agblevor, F. A., Hames, B. R., Schell, D., and Chum, H. L.. Analysis of Biomass Sugars Using a Novel HPLC Method. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1007/s12010-007-9028-4.
Agblevor, F. A., Hames, B. R., Schell, D., & Chum, H. L.. Analysis of Biomass Sugars Using a Novel HPLC Method. United States. doi:10.1007/s12010-007-9028-4.
Agblevor, F. A., Hames, B. R., Schell, D., and Chum, H. L.. Mon . "Analysis of Biomass Sugars Using a Novel HPLC Method". United States. doi:10.1007/s12010-007-9028-4.
@article{osti_915654,
title = {Analysis of Biomass Sugars Using a Novel HPLC Method},
author = {Agblevor, F. A. and Hames, B. R. and Schell, D. and Chum, H. L.},
abstractNote = {The precise quantitative analysis of biomass sugars is a very important step in the conversion of biomass feedstocks to fuels and chemicals. However, the most accurate method of biomass sugar analysis is based on the gas chromatography analysis of derivatized sugars either as alditol acetates or trimethylsilanes. The derivatization method is time consuming but the alternative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method cannot resolve most sugars found in biomass hydrolysates. We have demonstrated for the first time that by careful manipulation of the HPLC mobile phase, biomass monomeric sugars (arabinose, xylose, fructose, glucose, mannose, and galactose) can be analyzed quantitatively and there is excellent baseline resolution of all the sugars. This method was demonstrated for standard sugars, pretreated corn stover liquid and solid fractions. Our method can also be used to analyze dimeric sugars (cellobiose and sucrose).},
doi = {10.1007/s12010-007-9028-4},
journal = {Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology},
number = 3, 2007,
volume = 136,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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