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Title: Solar Technologies and the Building Envelope

Abstract

Advances in on-site renewable energy technology have brought the concept of zero-energy buildings within reach. Many single-story residential and commercial buildings have enough favorably oriented roof area to make achieving zero energy technically feasible, assuming no major solar obstructions exist and that energy efficiency has been aggressively implemented in the building design. As the number of stories increases, the potential to have a zero-energy building within the building's footprint decreases. As efficiencies of photovoltaic (PV) cells increase, the potential to have zero-energy buildings increases.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
915641
DOE Contract Number:  
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: ASHRAE Journal
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS; DESIGN; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; ROOFS; WALLS; RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS; PHOTOVOLTAIC CELLS; Buildings

Citation Formats

Torcellini, P. A., Pless, S. D., Judkoff, R., and Crawley, D. Solar Technologies and the Building Envelope. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Torcellini, P. A., Pless, S. D., Judkoff, R., & Crawley, D. Solar Technologies and the Building Envelope. United States.
Torcellini, P. A., Pless, S. D., Judkoff, R., and Crawley, D. Sun . "Solar Technologies and the Building Envelope". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_915641,
title = {Solar Technologies and the Building Envelope},
author = {Torcellini, P. A. and Pless, S. D. and Judkoff, R. and Crawley, D.},
abstractNote = {Advances in on-site renewable energy technology have brought the concept of zero-energy buildings within reach. Many single-story residential and commercial buildings have enough favorably oriented roof area to make achieving zero energy technically feasible, assuming no major solar obstructions exist and that energy efficiency has been aggressively implemented in the building design. As the number of stories increases, the potential to have a zero-energy building within the building's footprint decreases. As efficiencies of photovoltaic (PV) cells increase, the potential to have zero-energy buildings increases.},
doi = {},
journal = {ASHRAE Journal},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}