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Title: Relaxing passivity for human-robot interaction.

Abstract

Robots for high-force interaction with humans face particular challenges to achieve performance and coupled stability. Because available actuators are unable to provide sufficiently high force density and low impedance, controllers for such machines often attempt to mask the robots physical dynamics, though this threatens stability. Controlling for passivity, the state-of-the-art means of ensuring coupled stability, inherently limits performance to levels that are often unacceptable. A controller that imposes passivity is compared to a controller designed by a new method that uses limited knowledge of human dynamics to improve performance. Both controllers were implemented on a testbed, and coupled stability and performance were tested. Results show that the new controller can improve both stability and performance. The different structures of the controllers yield key differences in physical behavior, and guidelines are provided to assist in choosing the appropriate approach for specific applications.

Authors:
 [1];
  1. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
915595
Report Number(s):
SAND2006-1229C
TRN: US200816%%88
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems held October 9-15, 2006 in Bejing, China.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ACTUATORS; IMPEDANCE; PASSIVITY; PERFORMANCE; RECOMMENDATIONS; ROBOTS; STABILITY

Citation Formats

Buerger, Stephen P., and Hogan, Neville. Relaxing passivity for human-robot interaction.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1145/1376878.1376888.
Buerger, Stephen P., & Hogan, Neville. Relaxing passivity for human-robot interaction.. United States. doi:10.1145/1376878.1376888.
Buerger, Stephen P., and Hogan, Neville. Thu . "Relaxing passivity for human-robot interaction.". United States. doi:10.1145/1376878.1376888.
@article{osti_915595,
title = {Relaxing passivity for human-robot interaction.},
author = {Buerger, Stephen P. and Hogan, Neville},
abstractNote = {Robots for high-force interaction with humans face particular challenges to achieve performance and coupled stability. Because available actuators are unable to provide sufficiently high force density and low impedance, controllers for such machines often attempt to mask the robots physical dynamics, though this threatens stability. Controlling for passivity, the state-of-the-art means of ensuring coupled stability, inherently limits performance to levels that are often unacceptable. A controller that imposes passivity is compared to a controller designed by a new method that uses limited knowledge of human dynamics to improve performance. Both controllers were implemented on a testbed, and coupled stability and performance were tested. Results show that the new controller can improve both stability and performance. The different structures of the controllers yield key differences in physical behavior, and guidelines are provided to assist in choosing the appropriate approach for specific applications.},
doi = {10.1145/1376878.1376888},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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