skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Novel structures in ceramic interconnect technology.

Abstract

Ceramic interconnect technology has been adapted to new structures. In particular, the ability to customize processing order and material choices in Low Temperature Cofired Ceramic (LTCC) has enabled new features to be constructed, which address needs in MEMS packaging as well as other novel structures. Unique shapes in LTCC permit the simplification of complete systems, as in the case of a miniature ion mobility spectrometer (IMS). In this case, a rolled tube has been employed to provide hermetic external contacts to electrodes and structures internal to the tube. Integral windows in LTCC have been fabricated for use in both lids and circuits where either a short term need for observation or a long-term need for functionality exists. These windows are fabricated without adhesive, are fully compatible with LTCC processing, and remain optically clear. Both vented and encapsulated functional volumes have been fabricated using a sacrificial material technique. These hold promise for self-assembly of systems, as well as complex internal structures in cavities, micro fluidic and optical channels, and multilevel integration techniques. Separation of the burnout and firing cycles has permitted custom internal environments to be established. Existing commercial High Temperature Cofired Ceramic (HTCC) and LTCC systems can also be renderedmore » to have improved properties. A rapid prototyping technique for patterned HTCC packages has permitted prototypes to be realized in a few days, and has further applications to micro fluidics, heat pipes, and MEMS, among others. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
915589
Report Number(s):
SAND2003-0504C
TRN: US200816%%13
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at IMAPS Ceramic Interconnect Technology: The Next Generation, held April 7-9, 2003 in Denver, CO.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 42 ENGINEERING; CONNECTORS; CERAMICS; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; MORPHOLOGY; DESIGN; FABRICATION

Citation Formats

Peterson, Kenneth Allen, Rohde, Steven Barney, Casias, Adrian Luther, Stokes, Robert Neal, and Turner, Timothy Shawn. Novel structures in ceramic interconnect technology.. United States: N. p., 2003. Web.
Peterson, Kenneth Allen, Rohde, Steven Barney, Casias, Adrian Luther, Stokes, Robert Neal, & Turner, Timothy Shawn. Novel structures in ceramic interconnect technology.. United States.
Peterson, Kenneth Allen, Rohde, Steven Barney, Casias, Adrian Luther, Stokes, Robert Neal, and Turner, Timothy Shawn. Sat . "Novel structures in ceramic interconnect technology.". United States.
@article{osti_915589,
title = {Novel structures in ceramic interconnect technology.},
author = {Peterson, Kenneth Allen and Rohde, Steven Barney and Casias, Adrian Luther and Stokes, Robert Neal and Turner, Timothy Shawn},
abstractNote = {Ceramic interconnect technology has been adapted to new structures. In particular, the ability to customize processing order and material choices in Low Temperature Cofired Ceramic (LTCC) has enabled new features to be constructed, which address needs in MEMS packaging as well as other novel structures. Unique shapes in LTCC permit the simplification of complete systems, as in the case of a miniature ion mobility spectrometer (IMS). In this case, a rolled tube has been employed to provide hermetic external contacts to electrodes and structures internal to the tube. Integral windows in LTCC have been fabricated for use in both lids and circuits where either a short term need for observation or a long-term need for functionality exists. These windows are fabricated without adhesive, are fully compatible with LTCC processing, and remain optically clear. Both vented and encapsulated functional volumes have been fabricated using a sacrificial material technique. These hold promise for self-assembly of systems, as well as complex internal structures in cavities, micro fluidic and optical channels, and multilevel integration techniques. Separation of the burnout and firing cycles has permitted custom internal environments to be established. Existing commercial High Temperature Cofired Ceramic (HTCC) and LTCC systems can also be rendered to have improved properties. A rapid prototyping technique for patterned HTCC packages has permitted prototypes to be realized in a few days, and has further applications to micro fluidics, heat pipes, and MEMS, among others. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2003},
month = {2}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share: