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Title: Managing government funded scientific consortia

Abstract

In recent years, it is becoming apparent that good science not only requires the talents of individual scientists, but also state-of-the-art laboratory facilities. These faculties, often costing millions to billions of dollars, allow scientists unprecedented opportunities to advance their knowledge and improve the quality of human life. To make optimum use of these experimental facilities, a significant amount of computational simulations is required. These mega-projects require large-scale computational facilities and complementary infrastructures of network and software. For physical sciences in US, most of these research and development efforts are funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and National Science Foundation (NSF). Universities, US National Laboratories, and occasionally industrial partners work together on projects awarded with different flavors of government funds managed under different rules. At Fermilab, we manage multiple such collaborative computing projects for university and laboratory consortia. In this paper, I explore important lessons learned from my experience with these projects. Using examples of projects delivering computing infrastructure for the Lattice QCD Collaboration, I explain how the use of federal enterprise architecture may be deployed to run projects effectively. I also describe the lessons learned in the process. Lessons learned from the execution of the above projects aremore » also applicable to other consortia receiving federal government funds.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
915554
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-CONF-07-204
TRN: US200817%%592
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Conference
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ARCHITECTURE; DOLLARS; FERMILAB; NATIONAL GOVERNMENT; NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION; QUANTUM CHROMODYNAMICS; Other

Citation Formats

Banerjee, Bakul, and /Fermilab. Managing government funded scientific consortia. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Banerjee, Bakul, & /Fermilab. Managing government funded scientific consortia. United States.
Banerjee, Bakul, and /Fermilab. 2007. "Managing government funded scientific consortia". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/915554.
@article{osti_915554,
title = {Managing government funded scientific consortia},
author = {Banerjee, Bakul and /Fermilab},
abstractNote = {In recent years, it is becoming apparent that good science not only requires the talents of individual scientists, but also state-of-the-art laboratory facilities. These faculties, often costing millions to billions of dollars, allow scientists unprecedented opportunities to advance their knowledge and improve the quality of human life. To make optimum use of these experimental facilities, a significant amount of computational simulations is required. These mega-projects require large-scale computational facilities and complementary infrastructures of network and software. For physical sciences in US, most of these research and development efforts are funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and National Science Foundation (NSF). Universities, US National Laboratories, and occasionally industrial partners work together on projects awarded with different flavors of government funds managed under different rules. At Fermilab, we manage multiple such collaborative computing projects for university and laboratory consortia. In this paper, I explore important lessons learned from my experience with these projects. Using examples of projects delivering computing infrastructure for the Lattice QCD Collaboration, I explain how the use of federal enterprise architecture may be deployed to run projects effectively. I also describe the lessons learned in the process. Lessons learned from the execution of the above projects are also applicable to other consortia receiving federal government funds.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2007,
month = 6
}

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