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Title: Chemical Gradients in Crud on Boiling Water Reactor Fuel Elements

Abstract

Crud (radioactive corrosion products formed inside nuclear reactors is a major problem in commercial power-producing nuclear reactors. Although there are numerous studies of simulated (non-radioactive) crud, characteristics of crud from actual reactors are rarely studied. This study reports scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies of fragments of crud from a commercially operating boiling water reactor. Chemical analyses in the SEM indicated that the crud closest to the outer surfaces of the fuel pins in some areas had Fe:Zn ratios close to 2:1, which decreased away from the fuel pin in some of the fragments. In combination with transmission electron microsope analyses (published elsewhere), these results suggest that the innermost layer of crud in some areas may consist of franklinite (ZnFe2O4, also called zinc spinel), while outer layers in these areas may be predominantly iron oxides.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE - NE
OSTI Identifier:
915536
Report Number(s):
INL/CON-07-12474
TRN: US0805002
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC07-99ID-13727
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Energy for the Future,Idaho Falls,04/19/2007,04/21/2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
21 - SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; BOILING; CORROSION PRODUCTS; ELECTRON MICROSCOPES; FUEL ELEMENTS; FUEL PINS; IRON OXIDES; REACTORS; WATER; ZINC; Boiling Water Reactor; BWR; Corrosion Products; Crud; Nuclear Fuel

Citation Formats

D. L. Porter, and D. E. Janney. Chemical Gradients in Crud on Boiling Water Reactor Fuel Elements. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
D. L. Porter, & D. E. Janney. Chemical Gradients in Crud on Boiling Water Reactor Fuel Elements. United States.
D. L. Porter, and D. E. Janney. Sun . "Chemical Gradients in Crud on Boiling Water Reactor Fuel Elements". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/915536.
@article{osti_915536,
title = {Chemical Gradients in Crud on Boiling Water Reactor Fuel Elements},
author = {D. L. Porter and D. E. Janney},
abstractNote = {Crud (radioactive corrosion products formed inside nuclear reactors is a major problem in commercial power-producing nuclear reactors. Although there are numerous studies of simulated (non-radioactive) crud, characteristics of crud from actual reactors are rarely studied. This study reports scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies of fragments of crud from a commercially operating boiling water reactor. Chemical analyses in the SEM indicated that the crud closest to the outer surfaces of the fuel pins in some areas had Fe:Zn ratios close to 2:1, which decreased away from the fuel pin in some of the fragments. In combination with transmission electron microsope analyses (published elsewhere), these results suggest that the innermost layer of crud in some areas may consist of franklinite (ZnFe2O4, also called zinc spinel), while outer layers in these areas may be predominantly iron oxides.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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