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Title: Argonne premium coal sample program. Annual technical progress report. Reporting period : 2/2006-2/2007.

Abstract

This project provides highly uniform, premium (unexposed to oxygen) coal samples to researchers investigating coal structure, properties and behavior, and maintains accessible databases of published reports describing work carried out on the Argonne Premium Coal Samples. The samples are made available to DOE researchers and others. The eight carefully selected samples have been kept in as pristine a condition as possible through careful control the conditions in all stages from sample collection throughout processing and packaging. The samples are available in glass ampoules to ensure sample uniformity and maintain premium quality to ensure sample integrity.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
FE
OSTI Identifier:
914983
Report Number(s):
ANL-07/15
TRN: US200817%%188
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; COAL; GLASS; OXYGEN; PACKAGING; PROCESSING; PROGRESS REPORT

Citation Formats

Hunt, J. E., and Chemistry. Argonne premium coal sample program. Annual technical progress report. Reporting period : 2/2006-2/2007.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/914983.
Hunt, J. E., & Chemistry. Argonne premium coal sample program. Annual technical progress report. Reporting period : 2/2006-2/2007.. United States. doi:10.2172/914983.
Hunt, J. E., and Chemistry. Sun . "Argonne premium coal sample program. Annual technical progress report. Reporting period : 2/2006-2/2007.". United States. doi:10.2172/914983. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/914983.
@article{osti_914983,
title = {Argonne premium coal sample program. Annual technical progress report. Reporting period : 2/2006-2/2007.},
author = {Hunt, J. E. and Chemistry},
abstractNote = {This project provides highly uniform, premium (unexposed to oxygen) coal samples to researchers investigating coal structure, properties and behavior, and maintains accessible databases of published reports describing work carried out on the Argonne Premium Coal Samples. The samples are made available to DOE researchers and others. The eight carefully selected samples have been kept in as pristine a condition as possible through careful control the conditions in all stages from sample collection throughout processing and packaging. The samples are available in glass ampoules to ensure sample uniformity and maintain premium quality to ensure sample integrity.},
doi = {10.2172/914983},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Mar 04 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Sun Mar 04 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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  • This Users Handbook is intended to provide the recipients of Argonne Premium Coal Samples with a set of useful information to enhance the value of the samples and permit greater opportunities to compare their work with that of others, and to aid in correlations that can improve the value to all users. It is hoped that this document will foster a spirit of cooperation and collaboration such that the field of basic coal chemistry may be a more efficient and rewarding endeavor for all who participate. The different sections are intended to stand alone to avoid an occasional need tomore » leaf back-and-forth to find particular data. For this reason some of the information may be found in several places. The handbook is also intended to be a dynamic document, constantly subject to change through additions and improvements. Please feel free to write to the editor with your comments and suggestions. 111 refs.« less
  • This Users Handbook for the Argonne Premium Coal Samples provides the recipients of those samples with information that will enhance the value of the samples, to permit greater opportunities to compare their work with that of others, and aid in correlations that can improve the value to all users. It is hoped that this document will foster a spirit of cooperation and collaboration such that the field of basic coal chemistry may be a more efficient and rewarding endeavor for all who participate. The different sections are intended to stand alone. For this reason some of the information may bemore » found in several places. The handbook is also intended to be a dynamic document, constantly subject to change through additions and improvements. Please feel free to write to the editor with your comments and suggestions.« less
  • Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University has been successfully managing the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by Penn State, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350.more » This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. Base funding for the selected projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. At the annual funding meeting held in October 2003, ten projects were selected for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2004. Nine of the ten 2004 projects were completed during the previous annual reporting period and their final reports were submitted with the previous annual report (i.e., 10/01/04-09/30/05). The final report for the remaining project, which was submitted during this reporting period (i.e., 10/01/05-09/30/06), is attached. At the annual funding meeting held in November 2004, eleven projects were selected for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2005. Three additional projects were selected for funding during the April 2005 tutorial/funding meeting. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on July 1, 2005. Of these fourteen 2005 projects, eleven have been completed and the final reports are attached. An annual funding meeting was held in November 2005 and the council selected five projects for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2006, except for one that started October 1, 2006.« less
  • The Office of Radioisotope Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials andmore » technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Radioisotope Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2007. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.« less
  • The amplitude fluctuations of seismic waves from point source radiation patterns are among the direct results of rupture propagation. However, these amplitude signals are seldom used for small earthquakes due to the large uncertainties in the focal mechanisms of the events or the empirical Green’s functions (EGFs). Moreover, it has been controversial if radiation patterns still exist at high frequencies, e.g., 10 Hz. We present an evidence for high frequency radiation patterns by showing that with accurately determined focal mechanism solutions, the broadband P wave records from a thrust event (M 3.0) can be turned into those from a distinctlymore » different strike slip event of similar magnitude with simple radiation pattern corrections. Moreover, we observe systematic azimuthal variations in the P and S wave amplitude ratios between the records from unilateral magnitude 4 events and the EGF events, which suggest that these simple amplitude ratios can provide fast and useful indications of the rupture directivity. For further estimates of the fault dimension and rupture speed, we developed a forward modeling approach to retrieve apparent source time functions (ASTFs) of small earthquakes, where we assume simple Haskell model and take a grid search approach to find the ASTFs for each recording station. Compared to the usually used deconvolution approach, this method fully utilizes the information of both duration as well as amplitude. We applied this approach to the 2003 Big Bear sequence, and successfully obtained the complex rupture propagation patterns of the few large events (3.5 < M < 4.25), where both uni-lateral and bi-lateral events, fast and slow rupture speeds are observed.« less