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Title: Numerical modeling of mixed sediment resuspension, transport, and deposition during the March 1998 episodic events in southern Lake Michigan.

Abstract

A two-dimensional sediment transport model capable of simulating sediment resuspension of mixed (cohesive plus noncohesive) sediment is developed and applied to quantitatively simulate the March 1998 resuspension events in southern Lake Michigan. Some characteristics of the model are the capability to incorporate several floc size classes, a physically based settling velocity formula, bed armoring, and sediment availability limitation. Important resuspension parameters were estimated from field and laboratory measurement data. The model reproduced the resuspension plume (observed by the SeaWIFS satellite and field instruments) and recently measured sedimentation rate distribution (using radiotracer techniques) fairly well. Model results were verified with field measurements of suspended sediment concentration and settling flux (by ADCPs and sediment traps). Both wave conditions and sediment bed properties (critical shear stress, fine sediment fraction, and limited sediment availability or source) are the critical factors that determine the concentration distribution and width of the resuspension plume. The modeled sedimentation pattern shows preferential accumulation of sediment on the eastern side of the lake, which agrees with the observed sedimentation pattern despite a predominance of particle sources from the western shoreline. The main physical mechanisms determining the sedimentation pattern are (1) the two counter-rotating circulation gyres producing offshore mass transport alongmore » the southeastern coast during northerly wind and (2) the settling velocity of sediment flocs which controls the deposition location.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); NOAA
OSTI Identifier:
914964
Report Number(s):
ANL/OTD-AST/JA-58717
Journal ID: ISSN 0148-0227; JGREA2; TRN: US200817%%38
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Geophys. Res.; Journal Volume: 112; Journal Issue: C02018 ; Feb. 17, 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; LAKE MICHIGAN; SEDIMENTS; PARTICLE RESUSPENSION; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; DEPOSITION; FLOW MODELS; TWO-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS

Citation Formats

Lee, C., Schwab, D. J., Beletsky, D., Stroud, J., Lesht, B., PNNL, NOAA, Univ. of Michigan, and Univ. of Pennsylvania. Numerical modeling of mixed sediment resuspension, transport, and deposition during the March 1998 episodic events in southern Lake Michigan.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1029/2005JC003419.
Lee, C., Schwab, D. J., Beletsky, D., Stroud, J., Lesht, B., PNNL, NOAA, Univ. of Michigan, & Univ. of Pennsylvania. Numerical modeling of mixed sediment resuspension, transport, and deposition during the March 1998 episodic events in southern Lake Michigan.. United States. doi:10.1029/2005JC003419.
Lee, C., Schwab, D. J., Beletsky, D., Stroud, J., Lesht, B., PNNL, NOAA, Univ. of Michigan, and Univ. of Pennsylvania. Sat . "Numerical modeling of mixed sediment resuspension, transport, and deposition during the March 1998 episodic events in southern Lake Michigan.". United States. doi:10.1029/2005JC003419.
@article{osti_914964,
title = {Numerical modeling of mixed sediment resuspension, transport, and deposition during the March 1998 episodic events in southern Lake Michigan.},
author = {Lee, C. and Schwab, D. J. and Beletsky, D. and Stroud, J. and Lesht, B. and PNNL and NOAA and Univ. of Michigan and Univ. of Pennsylvania},
abstractNote = {A two-dimensional sediment transport model capable of simulating sediment resuspension of mixed (cohesive plus noncohesive) sediment is developed and applied to quantitatively simulate the March 1998 resuspension events in southern Lake Michigan. Some characteristics of the model are the capability to incorporate several floc size classes, a physically based settling velocity formula, bed armoring, and sediment availability limitation. Important resuspension parameters were estimated from field and laboratory measurement data. The model reproduced the resuspension plume (observed by the SeaWIFS satellite and field instruments) and recently measured sedimentation rate distribution (using radiotracer techniques) fairly well. Model results were verified with field measurements of suspended sediment concentration and settling flux (by ADCPs and sediment traps). Both wave conditions and sediment bed properties (critical shear stress, fine sediment fraction, and limited sediment availability or source) are the critical factors that determine the concentration distribution and width of the resuspension plume. The modeled sedimentation pattern shows preferential accumulation of sediment on the eastern side of the lake, which agrees with the observed sedimentation pattern despite a predominance of particle sources from the western shoreline. The main physical mechanisms determining the sedimentation pattern are (1) the two counter-rotating circulation gyres producing offshore mass transport along the southeastern coast during northerly wind and (2) the settling velocity of sediment flocs which controls the deposition location.},
doi = {10.1029/2005JC003419},
journal = {J. Geophys. Res.},
number = C02018 ; Feb. 17, 2007,
volume = 112,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Feb 17 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Sat Feb 17 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • A two-dimensional sediment transport model capable of simulating sediment resuspension of mixed (cohesive+noncohesive) sediment is developed and applied to quantitatively simulate the March 1998 resuspension events in southern Lake Michigan. Some characteristics of the model are the capability to incorporate several floc size classes, a physically-based settling velocity formula, bed armoring, and sediment availability limitation. Important resuspension parameters were estimated from field and laboratory measurement data. The model reproduced the resuspension plume (observed by the SeaWIFS satellite and field instruments) and recently measured sedimentation rate distribution (using radiotracer techniques) fairly well. Model results were verified with field measurements of suspendedmore » sediment concentration and settling flux (by ADCPs and sediment traps). Both wave conditions and sediment bed properties (critical shear stress, fine sediment fraction, and limited sediment availability or source) are the critical factors that determine the concentration distribution and width of the resuspension plume. The modeled sedimentation pattern shows preferential accumulation of sediment on the eastern side of the lake, which agrees with the observed sedimentation pattern despite a predominance of particle sources from the western shoreline. The main physical mechanisms determining the sedimentation pattern are 1) the two counter-rotating circulation gyres producing offshore mass transport along the southeastern coast during northerly wind and 2) the settling velocity of sediment flocs which controls the deposition location.« less
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  • Lake Houston is a man-made reservoir located northeast of Houston, Texas. The purpose of this investigation was to document suspended sediment transport, sedimentation, and resuspension in the lake with a view towards estimating the influence of sedimentation on water quality. Sediment traps were placed in strategic locations in the lake to collect suspended sediments. Samples were analyzed for bulk density, grain size, organic carbon, and a number of trace elements. These data were analyzed along with meteorological data to examine those factors which regulate suspended sediment input and dispersal, and the role of suspended sediments in controlling water quality withinmore » the lake. Sediment input to the lake depends primarily on the intensity of rainfall in the watershed. Sediment movement within the lake is strongly influenced by wave activity, which resuspends sediments from shallow areas, and by wind-driven circulation. The increased residence time of suspended sediments due to resuspension allows greater decomposition of organic matter and the release of several trace elements from sediments to the water column. Virtually all samples from sediment traps suspended between 1 and 5 m above the lake bottom contain medium to coarse silt, and even some very fine sand-sized material. This implies that circulation in Lake Houston is periodically intense enough to transport this size material in suspension. During winter, northerly winds with sustained velocities of greater than 5 m/sec provide the most suitable condition for rapid (< 1 d) transport of suspended sediment down the length of the lake. Fluctuations in current velocities and the subsequent suspension/deposition of particles may explain variations in the abundance of coliform bacteria in Lake Houston.« less
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  • In this paper we develop and examine several schemes for combining daily images obtained from the Sea-viewing Wide Field Spectrometer (SeaWiFS) with a two-dimensional sediment transport model of Lake Michigan. We consider two data assimilation methods, direct insertion and a kriging-based approach, and perform a forecasting study focused on a 2-month period in spring 1998 when a large storm caused substantial amounts of sediment resuspension and horizontal sediment transport in the lake. By beginning with the simplest possible forecast method and sequentially adding complexity we are able to assess the improvements offered by combining the satellite data with the numericalmore » model. In our application, we find that data assimilation schemes that include both the data and the lake dynamics improve forecast root mean square error by 40% over purely model-based approaches and by 20% over purely data-based approaches.« less