skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Modeling study of air pollution due to the manufacture of export goods in China's Pearl River Delta.

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USEPA
OSTI Identifier:
914752
Report Number(s):
ANL/DIS/JA-53876
Journal ID: ISSN 0013-936X; ESTHAG; TRN: US200812%%263
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environ. Sci. Technol.; Journal Volume: 40; Journal Issue: 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AIR POLLUTION; EXPORTS; SIMULATION

Citation Formats

Streets, D. G., Yu, C., Bergin, M. H., Wang, X., Carmichael, G. R., Decision and Information Sciences, Georgia Inst. of Tech., Univ. of Iowa, and Zhongshan Univ. Guangzhou. Modeling study of air pollution due to the manufacture of export goods in China's Pearl River Delta.. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1021/es051275n.
Streets, D. G., Yu, C., Bergin, M. H., Wang, X., Carmichael, G. R., Decision and Information Sciences, Georgia Inst. of Tech., Univ. of Iowa, & Zhongshan Univ. Guangzhou. Modeling study of air pollution due to the manufacture of export goods in China's Pearl River Delta.. United States. doi:10.1021/es051275n.
Streets, D. G., Yu, C., Bergin, M. H., Wang, X., Carmichael, G. R., Decision and Information Sciences, Georgia Inst. of Tech., Univ. of Iowa, and Zhongshan Univ. Guangzhou. Sun . "Modeling study of air pollution due to the manufacture of export goods in China's Pearl River Delta.". United States. doi:10.1021/es051275n.
@article{osti_914752,
title = {Modeling study of air pollution due to the manufacture of export goods in China's Pearl River Delta.},
author = {Streets, D. G. and Yu, C. and Bergin, M. H. and Wang, X. and Carmichael, G. R. and Decision and Information Sciences and Georgia Inst. of Tech. and Univ. of Iowa and Zhongshan Univ. Guangzhou},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {10.1021/es051275n},
journal = {Environ. Sci. Technol.},
number = 2006,
volume = 40,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • The Pearl River Delta is a major manufacturing region on the south coast of China that produces more thanmore » $$100 billion of goods annually for export to North America, Europe, and other parts of Asia. Considerable air pollution is caused by the manufacturing industries themselves and by the power plants, trucks, and ships that support them. It is estimated that 10-40% of emissions of primary SO{sub 2}, NOx, RSP, and VOC in the region are caused by export-related activities. Using the STEM-2K1 atmospheric transport model, it is estimated that these emissions contribute 5-30% of the ambient concentrations of SO{sub 2}, NOx, NOz, and VOC in the region. (NO{sub Z}=PAN, HONO, HNO{sub 3}, N{sub 2}O{sub 5} and organic nitrates). One reason that the exported goods are cheap and therefore attractive to consumers in developed countries is that emission controls are lacking or of low performance. It is estimated that state-of-the-art controls could be installed at an annualized cost of $$0.3-3 billion, representing 0.3-3% of the value of the goods produced. Mitigation measures could be adopted without seriously affecting the prices of exported goods and would achieve considerable human health and other benefits in the form of reduced air pollutant concentrations in densely populated urban areas. 22 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.« less
  • This paper demonstrates the applicability of the stochastic choice method in performing policy analysis of changes in public goods using survey data. The air-quality problem studied involves air-pollution control for the Tampa Bay area of Florida and relatively simple choices between changes in a public good and disposable income. It illustrates the use of surveys as a public forum in which preferences are revealed. 26 references, 2 tables.
  • In this study, the BVOC emissions in November 2010 over the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region in southern China have been estimated by the latest version of a Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) emission model (MEGAN v2.1). The evaluation of MEGAN performance at a representative forest site within this region indicates MEGAN can estimate BVOC emissions reasonably well in this region except overestimating isoprene emission in autumn for reasons that are discussed in this manuscript. Along with the output from MEGAN, the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to estimate the impacts of BVOC emissions onmore » surface ozone in the PRD region. The results show BVOC emissions increase the daytime ozone peak by *3 ppb on average, and the max hourly impacts of BVOC emissions on the daytime ozone peak is 24.8 ppb. Surface ozone mixing ratios in the central area of Guangzhou- Foshan and the western Jiangmen are most sensitive to BVOC emissions BVOCs from outside and central PRD influence the central area of Guangzhou-Foshan and the western Jiangmen significantly while BVOCs from rural PRD mainly influence the western Jiangmen. The impacts of BVOC emissions on surface ozone differ in different PRD cities, and the impact varies in different seasons. Foshan and Jiangmen being most affected in autumn, result in 6.0 ppb and 5.5 ppb increases in surface ozone concentrations, while Guangzhou and Huizhou become more affected in summer. Three additional experiments concerning the sensitivity of surface ozone to MEGAN input variables show that surface ozone is more sensitive to landcover change, followed by emission factors and meteorology.« less
  • Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured in 59 surface sediments from rivers in the Pearl River Delta and the northern continental shelf of the South China Sea. Total PAH concentrations varied from 138 to 6,793 ng/g dry weight. The sources of PAH inputs to sediments in the Pearl River Delta were qualitatively and quantitatively determined by diagnostic ratios and principal components analysis with multiple linear regression. The results showed that on average coal and wood combustion, petroleum spills, vehicle emissions, and nature sources contributed 36%, 27%, 25%, and 12% of total PAHs, respectively. Coal and biomass combustion was the mainmore » source of PAHs in sediments of the South China Sea, whereas petroleum combustion was the main source of pyrolytic PAHs in riverine and estuarine sediments of the Pearl River Delta. Perylene was formed in situ in river sediments and then transported to coastal areas along with other PAHs. The relative abundance of perylene from five-ring PAHs can be used to estimate the contribution of riverine-discharged PAHs to coastal sediments.« less
  • China's EIA Law does not require transboundary proposals to be assessed, despite recognition of this globally, for example in the Espoo Convention and Kiev Protocol, and in the European EIA and SEA Directives. In a transboundary context assessment within a state is unusual, as regulating these effects is primarily about the relationship between states. However where a state has more than one legal system such as in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) Region of southern China, transboundary effects should also be addressed. Yet despite the geographical connections between Guangdong Province in mainland China (where the EIA Law applies) and themore » Hong Kong and Macau Special Administrative Regions (which have their own provisions, neither of which requires transboundary assessments), EIA and SEA are carried out separately. Coordinated or joint approaches to transboundary assessment are generally absent, with the legal autonomy of Hong Kong and Macau a major constraint. As a result institutional responses at the policy level have developed. The article considers global experiences with regulating transboundary EIA and SEA, and analyses potential application to land use, transport and air and water planning in the PRD Region. If applied, benefits may include prevention or mitigation of cumulative effects, broader public participation, and improvements to environmental governance. The PRD Region experience may encourage China to conduct and coordinate EIA and SEA processes with neighbouring states, which has been non-existent or extremely limited to date.« less